Professor Derek Keene MA, DPhil (Oxon)

Emeritus Professor of Metropolitan History and Honorary Fellow

Derek Keene in his carpenter's workshop at home in Telegraph Hill

At the IHR Derek Keene was the founding director of the Centre for Metropolitan History (1987-2001) and then Leverhulme Professor of Comparative Metropolitan History until his retirement in 2008. At present he is working on numerous aspects European metropolises, including London, over the period 600-1300. His books include Survey of Medieval Winchester (Oxford, 1985); A Medieval Capital and its Grain Supply: Agrarian Production and Distribution in the London Region c.1300 [with B.M.S. Campbell, J. Galloway, and M. Murphy] (London, 1993); and, as general editor and author, St Paul's: the Cathedral Church of London, 604-2004 (New Haven and London, 2004). He contributed chapters to the recent Cambridge Urban History of Britain. Immediately forthcoming essays include 'Towns and trade: the eleventh and twelfth centuries' (in the New Cambridge Medieval History) and 'Cities and Empires' (in Journal of Urban History).

Research and publications

Derek Keene was the founding director of the Centre for Metropolitan History. His research and publications have focused on towns and their regional setting in Europe, from the seventh to the nineteenth century. He is particularly concerned to incorporate the evidence of artefacts, material environment and spatial forms in thinking about the economic, social, cultural and political history of towns and their wider setting.

His books include Survey of Medieval Winchester (Oxford, 1985); A Medieval Capital and its Grain Supply: Agrarian Production and Distribution in the London Region c.1300 [with B.M.S. Campbell, J. Galloway, and M. Murphy] (London, 1993); and, as general editor and author, St Paul's: the Cathedral Church of London, 604-2004 (New Haven and London, 2004). He contributed chapters to the recent Cambridge Urban History of Britain. Immediately forthcoming essays include 'Towns and trade: the eleventh and twelfth centuries' (in the New Cambridge Medieval History) and 'Cities and Empires' (in Journal of Urban History).