Professor Miles Taylor, PhD (Cantab), FRHS

Director

Phone: 
+44 (0)20 7862 8759

Director of the IHR and Professor of History

Miles Taylor joined the IHR as Director in 2008. He has held chairs at the universities of York and Southampton, having taught at King’s College London and Christ’s College, Cambridge, and studied history at Queen Mary, University of London, Harvard and Cambridge.

Professor Taylor has served on the Research Review Panel of the Arts and Humanities Research Council and on the editorial board of the Royal Historical Society's Studies in History series. He is currently a member of the History of Parliament editorial board, the editorial board of the Journal of British Studies and of the Grants Assessment Panel of the Economic and Social Research Council.

Research and publications

Professor Taylor’s expertise lies mainly in the history of Victorian Britain. He is currently writing a book on the history of parliamentary representation in Britain since the late 18th century, and a study of the Victorian monarchy and India.

Books

  • Ernest Jones, Chartism and the Romance of Politics, 1819-69 (Oxford UP, 2003)
  • The Decline of British Radicalism, 1847-1860 (Oxford UP, 1995)

Edited books

  • Southampton: Gateway to the British Empire (IB Tauris, 2007)
  • (co-ed.), Palmerston Studies (2 vols, Hartley Institute, 2007)
  • (co-ed.), The Victorians since 1901: Histories, Representations and Revisions (Manchester UP, 2004)
  • Walter Bagehot, The English Constitution (Oxford World’s Classics, OUP, 2001)
  • (co-ed.), Party, State and Society: Electoral Behaviour in Britain since 1820 (Scolar Press, 1997)
  • The European Diaries of Richard Cobden, 1846-1849 (Scolar Press, 1994)

Articles

  • ‘Joseph Hume and the reformation of India, 1819-33’ in G Burgess & M Festenstein (eds.), Radicalism in English Political Thought, 1550-1850 (Cambridge UP, 2007)
  • ‘Queen Victoria and India, 1837-61’, Victorian Studies, 47, 1 (Winter, 2004)
  • ‘Empire and parliamentary reform: the 1832 Reform Act revisited’ in A. Burns & J. Innes (eds.), Rethinking the Age of Reform: Britain, c. 1780-1850 (Cambridge University Press, 2003)
  • ‘Labour and the constitution’ in D. Tanner et al (eds.), Labour's First Century (Cambridge UP, 2000)
  • ‘The 1848 revolutions and the British empire’, Past & Present 166, (Feb., 2000)
  • ‘The six points: Chartism and the reform of parliament’ in Owen Ashton et al (eds.), The Chartist Legacy (Merlin Press, 1999)
  • ‘The beginnings of modern British social history ?’, History Workshop Journal, 43, (Spring, 1997)
  • ‘John Bull and the iconography of public opinion in England, c. 1712-1929’, Past & Present, 134, (Feb., 1992)