Guildhall Library Manuscripts Section

General Guide


18: INSTITUTIONS (iii) Schools and Colleges


This section has been divided into three categories for each school: pupil records which include admission and attendance registers; estate records which may predate the administrative records of the school by a considerable period; and other records of administration. Covering dates only are given and gaps in series of records are not indicated.

Further details of pupil records, including some early unindexed admissions in minutes, can be found in the pupils records leaflet on this website.

Full catalogue entries will be found in our online catalogue (use the “Former catalogue”). To find the entries, do a Classification search for the Manuscript number given below in bold, adding leading zeroes if necessary to give the number five digits (e.g. Ms 05439 or Ms 15879).

If the collection consists of a single document, it will be given in the following way in this guide: Ms 1775; if the collection consists of more than one document, the first manuscript reference number only will be given with a dash to indicate further numbers, e.g. Ms 31098-. In order to find the entries in our online catalogue, please just enter the first number in a classification search, without a dash, e.g. Ms 31098. This search will find the collection level description which shows the full range of manuscript numbers for each collection.

The catalogue is available in hard copy at the Manuscripts Section's enquiry desk.

These records are all held in the main store, so do not need to be ordered in advance. Some modern records, particularly pupil records, are restricted and this is noted in the relevant entries below.

Many of the records form part of larger archives, eg. those of livery companies and parishes. Cross references are given as appropriate.


ADAMS' GRAMMAR SCHOOL, Newport, Shropshire. Founded by William Adams in 1656 for 80 local boys and administered by the Haberdashers’ Company. Now (2007) has 780 pupils. Ms 15879-

Estates records, 1653-7

Administrative records, 1656-1979

Part of the Haberdashers' Company archives - see Section 18(ii).

 

ALDENHAM SCHOOL, of Aldenham, Hertfordshire. Founded as a grammar school in 1595/6 by Richard Platt. Conveyed to the Brewers' Company in 1599 who still (2007) play an active role. Ms 5439-

Administrative records, 1595/6-1922

Part of the Brewers' Company archives - see Section 18 (ii).

 

ALDERSGATE WARD SCHOOL, of various (hired) City of London premises; 160-1 Aldersgate Street from 1859-75. Founded 1702; in 1859 merged with the National School and in 1875 with the Farringdon Within Ward Schools. Ms 1489-

Pupil records 1863-1940 (including log books 1863-1913, boys' admission register 1889-1908, girls' attendance at domestic economy classes 1911-28, infants' attendance register 1908-40)

Estates records, 1823-1951

Administrative records, 1700-1951

Part of Aldersgate Ward records - see Section 11 (ii). See also Section 18 (iv) St Alphage Society.

 

ALDGATE WARD SCHOOL, between Duke Street and Mitre Street.. Founded circa 1717 for boys and girls, merged with the Cass School, q.v., in 1907. Ms 1150-

Pupil records, 1800-68 (children's attendance register)

Estates records, 1806-1907

Administrative records, 1723-1907

Part of Aldgate Ward records - see Section 11 (ii).

 

ASHWELL SCHOOL, of Ashwell, Hertfordshire. Established in late 17th century under the will of Henry Colbron as a free grammar school. Transferred to Hertfordshire County Council in 1903 but with Merchant Taylors’ Company involvement until 1926. Ms 34238A-40, 34264, 34265A, 34306, 34326

Administrative records, 1664, 1770-9, 1850-1950

Estate records, early 19th century – early 20th century

Part of the archives of the Merchant Taylors' Company - see Section 18 (ii).

 

ASKE’S HOSPITAL SCHOOLS see HABERDASHERS’ ASKE'S SCHOOL and HABERDASHERS’ ASKE'S HATCHAM BOYS SCHOOL AND GIRLS SCHOOL

BREAD STREET WARD SCHOOL see CORDWAINER AND BREAD STREET WARDS CHARITY SCHOOL

 

BILLINGSGATE WARD SCHOOL, of 32 Botolph Lane (1852-74). Established in 1714 to educate boys and girls. United with Tower Ward School, q.v. in 1874 to form Billingsgate and Tower Wards School, q.v. Ms 1452-

Pupil records, 1869-74 (admission register)

Administration records, 1718-1875

 

BILLINGSGATE AND TOWER WARDS SCHOOL, of 32 Botolph Lane (1874-). The two existing schools of Billingsgate and Tower Wards united in 1874, merged with the combined Bridge, Candlewick and Dowgate Wards School, q.v., in 1891 and then combined with St Botolph Parochial School, q.v., in 1905 to form the Junior School of the Cass School, q.v. Ms 1452-

Pupil records, 1874-1905 (admission registers)

Administration records, 1874-1905

 

BOYS’ SCHOOL, RED CROSS STREET see CRIPPLEGATE SCHOOLS FOUNDATION

 

BRIDEWELL HOUSE OF OCCUPATIONS see KING EDWARD’S SCHOOL, WITLEY

 

BRIDGE, CANDLEWICK AND DOWGATE WARDS SCHOOL, of 13 Swan Lane (in 1891). Date of establishment unknown; amalgamated with Billingsgate and Tower Wards School, q.v., in 1891. Ms 31165-

Estates records, 1891-1936

Administration records, 1847-89

 

BROAD STREET WARD SCHOOL, of Leg and Ball Alley, London Wall. Established in 1713 for boys and girls. Amalgamated with the Cass School, q.v., in 1907.  Ms 31167-

Pupil records, 1793-1907 (including girls’ admission register 1793-1898 and boys’ admission register 1816-98)

Estates records, 1713-1907

Administration records, 1713-1907

 

BUNBURY SCHOOL, of Bunbury, Cheshire. Established by Thomas Aldersey in 1594/5 as a free grammar school to be run by the Haberdashers' Company. In 1902 it became a public elementary school and in 1958 a voluntary assisted primary school. Now (2007) known as the Bunbury Aldersey Primary School with 230 children. Ms 15885-

Administrative records, 1576-1979

Part of the Haberdashers' Company archives - see Section 18 (ii).

 

CASS SCHOOL, of Aldgate (1710-62); Church Row (1762-1869); Jewry Street (1869-1908); St James Duke’s Place Churchyard (1908-), with junior school at Church Row (1869-90, taken over by School Board for London) and infant school at Goodman's Yard (1871-91).

Founded by Sir John Cass in 1710 (although a ward school existed from circa 1689) for 50 boys and 40 girls. In 1869 pupil numbers were 110 boys and 90 girls. Between 1900-1907, the following schools (all q.v.) amalgamated with the Cass School: Billingsgate Ward School; Bridge, Candlewick and Dowgate Wards School; Broad Street Ward School; Cornhill and Lime Street Wards School; Langbourn Ward School; St Botolph Aldgate Parochial School; Tower Ward School. Administered by Sir John Cass’s Foundation, q.v.

In 1944 the secondary department of the Cass School amalgamated with the Red Coat School, Stepney, q.v. to form the Sir John Cass's Foundation and Red Coat School in Stepney Way. The Cass School became and remains a primary school. Ms 31098-

Pupil records, 1841-1945 (including admission register 1896-1945 and log book 1905-13)

Estates records, 1710-1909

Administrative records, 1870-1960 (see archive of Sir John Cass’s Foundation for earlier administration and finance - before 1895, there was little separation of the administration of the Cass School and the Cass charity).

 

CASTLE BAYNARD WARD SCHOOL, established circa 1750, merged with Vintry and Queenhithe Ward Schools in 1875. United school was then administered by the National Society. Ms 10219

Administrative records (trustees minutes only), 1753-1835

Part of Castle Baynard Ward records - see Section 11 (ii).

 

CHARITABLE SOCIETY OF ST MICHAEL CORNHILL see CORNHILL AND LIME STREET WARDS SCHOOL

 

CHRIST'S HOSPITAL, founded by royal charter in 1552 in Newgate Street; moved to Horsham, Sussex, in 1902. Branches (all in Hertfordshire): at Hertford from at least 1653 (used as the girls school 1778-1985 and as the boys preparatory school 1778-1902); at Hoddesdon from 1666- circa 1690; and at Ware from late 17th century to 1760. 1552-1982. Ms 12805-

Pupil records, 1563-1948 (records of admission and discharge 1563-1911 [boys only for 1891-1911] for schools in London, Hertford, Horsham and to the Royal Mathematical School, 1563-1911). Restricted access to Ms 22551. See also the leaflet about Christ’s Hospital School on this website, http://www.history.ac.uk/gh/christ1.htm.

Also registers of marine apprentice bindings, 1675-1711.

Estate records, late 12th-20th centuries. Substantial collection.

Administrative records, 1552-1960 (including court and committee minutes 1556-1948, financial records 1552-1960, records of the hospital's authority to license carmen 1582-1837, records of Blackwell Hall 1612-1761).

Administrative records of the Royal Mathematical School, 1673-1711.

 

CITY AND GUILDS COLLEGE, of Exhibition Road, Kensington. Established in 1884 by the City and Guilds of London Institute, q.v., as the Central Institution, renamed in 1893 as the Central Technical College and in 1911 as the City and Guilds College from 1911 (informally known as the City and Guilds Engineering College 1911-35). Formed part of newly established Imperial College of Science and Technology from 1907. Ms 21906-10, Ms 21947-59, Ms 21985-6, Ms 38285

Admin records: 1879-1984

Pupil records: 1884-1912 (copy attendance, exam entry and pass lists 1884-1912; two marked exam papers 1909)

 

CITY AND GUILDS OF LONDON INSTITUTE of Gresham College (1878-1958), 76 Portland Place (1958-96) and 1 Giltspur Street (1996-). Established in 1878 by City of London Corporation and livery companies to improve UK technical education through examination, grants and establishment of technical institutes: Finsbury Technical College, q.v.; South London Technical Art School, q.v.; City and Guilds College, q.v.; Leather Trades School, q.v. Ms 21810-  

Pupil records, 1879-1958 (including pass lists of candidates 1879-87 and registers of full technological certificates awarded to students 1899-1958)

Administrative records, 1878-1992 (including letter books concerning grants to other institutions engaged in technical education 1878-1909)

 

CITY OF LONDON SCHOOL OF INSTRUCTION AND INDUSTRY, of St James Duke’s Place (1806- circa 1816); 5 Mitre Square, Aldgate (circa 1817 – 1845/6). Established in 1806 for the education, clothing and instruction in trades of both boys and girls. Known until 1818 as the St. James Duke's Place School of Instruction and Industry. Wound up in 1845/6. Ms 5940-

Pupil records, 1807-45 (including boys' and girls' admission books 1807-41, and attendance rolls 1811-45).

Estates records, 1824

Administrative records, 1806-46

 

COLEMAN STREET WARD SCHOOLS, of Little Swan Alley and Copthall Avenue and Crosskey Court, London Wall (from 1786). Established in 1718 for boys and girls. Administered by the National Society for promoting religious education. Ms 7035-

Pupil records, 1871-1917 (including boys' admission register 1871-1905, girls' admission register 1898-1917, infants' admission register 1895-1908 and infants’ log book).

Estates records, 1759-1913

Administrative records, 1803-1939

Part of Coleman Street Ward records - see Section 11 (ii).

 

CORDWAINER AND BREAD STREET WARDS CHARITY SCHOOL, successively of Well Court, Bow Lane; Old Change; Little Distaff Lane; Shooters’ Hill Kent (from 1854). Established for boys in 1701 and for girls in 1714. Ms 1775

Administrative records (trustees’ minute book only), 1715-27

Part of the records of both wards - see Section 11 (ii).

 

CORNHILL AND LIME STREET WARDS SCHOOL, of St Mary Axe. Established in 1708/9 as the “Society of godly and pious persons in St Mary le Bow”, changed to the Charitable Society of St Michael Cornhill in 1711 and to the Cornhill and Lime Street Ward Schools in 1768. Amalgamated with Langbourn Ward School in 1874 to form Cornhill, Lime Street and Langbourn Wards School, q.v. Ms 5063-

Estates records, 1849

Administration records, 1708/9-1873

 

CORNHILL, LIME STREET AND LANGBOURN WARDS SCHOOL, of St Mary Axe. Established by the amalgamation of Cornhill and Lime Street Wards School with Langbourn Ward School in 1874. Merged with the Cass School, q.v., in 1903. Ms 31177-

Pupil records, 1874-1902 (girls’ admission register 1874-1902, with retrospective entries from 1869 and log books 1875-1902)

Administration records, 1874-1903

 

CRIPPLEGATE SCHOOLS FOUNDATION, of Cripplegate Institute, Golden Lane. Founded 1904 to administer the parish schools of St Giles Cripplegate: the Boys' School and Lady Holles' School for Girls. 1905-76. Ms 75A-

Boys' School, Red Cross Street. Successively of White Cross Street, Glovers’ Hall, Barbican, Red Cross Street (1709-1864), Bridgewater Square (1864-unknown date). Founded 1698 for 100 boys. Endowed by will of Thomas Moore in 1709.  

Pupil records, 1707-48 (admissions lists, in Ms 75A)

Estates records, 1527-1852

Administrative records, 1690-1905  

Lady Holles’ School, of Red Cross Street (1711-unknown date); Hackney (1878-1935); Hampton, Middlesex (1935-). Founded in 1711 by will of Lady Eleanor Holles. Now (2007) has 860 pupils and is known as the Lady Eleanor Holles School.

Estates records, 1527-1852

Administrative records, 1690-1904

  

CRIPPLEGATE WITHIN WARD SCHOOLS, of various hired premises, chiefly in Philip Lane. Established circa 1712, admitted girls from 1713. Closed in 1892, charitable funds administered by Aldersgate Ward School (q.v.). Ms 7013-

Pupil records, 1823-92 (attendance book 1823-33; girls’ and boys’ log books 1863-92)

Estates records, 1784-1822

Administrative records, 1712-1892

Part of Cripplegate Within Ward records - see Section 11 (ii).

 

DAME ALICE OWEN’S SCHOOL, by St John Street, Islington (1613-1973), Potters Bar, Hertfordshire (1973-). Founded for 30 boys by Dame Alice Owen in 1613 next to her almshouses and run, similarly, by the Brewers’ Company. A girls' school was added in 1886 and both schools combined in Potters Bar, Hertfordshire in 1973. Ms 5478-

Pupil records, 1842-1914 (boys' applications for admission 1842-50, 1879-1914)

Estates records, 1845-1918

Administrative records, 1600-1928

Part of the archives of the Brewers' Company - see Section 18 (ii).

 

DAME ANNE PACKINGTON’S SCHOOL, of Charterhouse Square (1829-60), Aldersgate Street (from 1860). Established in 1829 under the will of Dame Anne Packington. Ms 7018-

Pupil records, 1829-67 (admission register)

Administrative records, 1829-75

Part of the parish archives of St Botolph Aldersgate - see Section 16 (i).                   

 

FARRINGDON WITHIN WARD SCHOOLS, of Bull and Mouth Street. Established in 1705; amalgamated with Aldersgate Ward School, q.v., in 1875. Ms 3038-

Administrative records, 1756-1884

Part of Farringdon Within Ward records - see Section 11 (ii).

 

FINSBURY TECHNICAL COLLEGE, of Cowper Street, Finsbury. Established in 1879 by City and Guilds of London Institute, q.v. Closed in 1926. Ms 21911-24, Ms 21960-87, Ms 35815

Pupil records, 1882-1926 (including evening students' admission register 1882-90, day students' admission register 1892-1926, index of students circa 1883-1926 and reports on individual students’ work 1886-1926)

Admin records: 1879-1927

 

GRESHAM'S SCHOOL, Holt, Norfolk. Founded as a boys’ school by Sir John Gresham in 1555, with letters patent in 1562 appointing the Fishmongers' Company as governors (the Company still, 2007, has close links).  Girls were first admitted in 1971 and the school became fully co-educational in the 1980s.  Ms 6260-

Pupil records, 1729-1891 (including admissions register 1729-1857 and prize list 1846-91)

Estates records, 1327/8-1980

Administrative records, 1633-1901

Part of the archives of the Fishmongers' Company - see Section 18 (ii).

 

HABERDASHERS’ ASKE'S SCHOOL, of Pitfield Street, Hoxton, Middlesex (1690-1898); Hampstead and Acton, Middlesex (1898-1961); Elstree, Hertfordshire (1961- and 1974-). Robert Aske (died 1689) left money to the Haberdashers' Company to buy land in Hoxton on which the Company was to build almshouses and a school for 20 sons of poor freemen of the Company. In 1873-5 the school was reorganised as a school for girls and boys and the almshouses closed. In 1898 the boys school moved to Hampstead and the girls school to Acton. Boys school moved to Elstree in 1961 and the girls school moved there in 1974. They became independent schools in 1976. The girls school is now known as Haberdashers’ Aske School for Girls. See also Haberdashers’ Aske’s Hatcham Schools. All the Haberdashers’ Aske’s Schools still (2007) have very strong connections with the Company. Ms 15852-

Pupil records, 1875-1919 (boys and girls admission registers)

Administrative records, 1689-1979

Part of the Haberdashers' Company archives - see Section 18 (ii).

 

HABERDASHERS’ ASKE'S SCHOOL FOR GIRLS see HABERDASHERS’ ASKE'S SCHOOL

 

HABERDASHERS’ ASKE'S HATCHAM BOYS SCHOOL AND GIRLS SCHOOL. In 1873-5, land was purchased by the Haberdashers’ Company at Plowed Garlic Hill (later known as Telegraph Hill), Hatcham, New Cross to build a boys school. A girls school was added to this site in 1889.In 1944 these Hatcham schools became voluntary controlled grammar schools; in 1976 comprehensive schools, and they combined in 1991 as a City Technology College. In 2004 the CTC was remodelled to become the two schools known as Haberdashers' Aske's Hatcham College and Haberdashers' Aske's Knights Academy. Lewisham Local Studies and Archives hold most of the records of the schools, particularly the boys school and lists are available in the Manuscripts Section accession files. See also Haberdashers’ Aske’s School. All the Haberdashers’ Aske’s Schools still (2007) have very strong connections with the Company.  Ms 15847-

Administrative records, 1873-1973

Part of the Haberdashers' Company archives - see Section 18 (ii).

 

HACKNEY DOWNS SCHOOL. Hackney Downs Grammar School, also known as the Grocers' School, was opened by the Grocers' Company in 1876. Always a boys school, in 1968 it became comprehensive and was closed in 1995. Ms 11633-

Pupil records, 1885-95 (scholarship register)

Administrative records, 1873-1907

Part of the archives of the Grocers' Company - see Section 18 (ii).

 

HALSTEAD SCHOOL, of Halstead, Essex. Established as a free grammar school by Dame Mary Ramsey in 1594 and administered by Christ’s Hospital. Ms 12861, Ms 13583-8

Estates records, 1590-5, 1667

Administrative records, 1680-1918

Part of the archives of Christ's Hospital, q.v.

 

HAY FREE SCHOOL, Brecon see PENNOYER'S SCHOOL, HAY ON WYE

 

HOUSE OF OCCUPATIONS, SOUTHWARK see KING EDWARD’S SCHOOL, WITLEY

 

KING EDWARD’S SCHOOL, LONDON see KING EDWARD’S SCHOOL, WITLEY

 

KING EDWARD’S SCHOOL, WITLEY, successively of Bridewell (late 16th century-1830); St. George’s Fields, Southwark (1830-67); Witley, Surrey (1867-date). Bridewell Royal Hospital (see Section 18vi) took children to be apprenticed from late 16th century and in 1632 a schoolmaster was employed to teach apprentices for a few hours a week. In 1830 a new Bridewell House of Occupations was opened on a separate site from Bridewell which took boys and girls from 8 to 18. In 1860, renamed as King Edward’s Schools (while still administered by Bridewell Royal Hospital), and admitted children from 11 or 12. In 1867 the boys’ school moved to Witley and was renamed King Edward’s School, Witley. Girls’ school remained in Southwark and was renamed King Edward’s School, London until its closure in 1922. King Edward’s School, Witley became co-educational in 1952. See records of Bridewell Royal Hospital for estate and earlier administrative records. Later pupil records have been retained by the school. Restricted access to pupil records (100 years) Ms 33148- 

Pupil records, 1835-1927 (including boys’ admission and discharge registers 1835-44, 1855-1927 and girls’ admission and discharge registers 1835-44, (1848-57 discharges only), 1858-1922). See also the leaflet on pupil records of King Edward’s Schools on this website, http://www.history.ac.uk/gh/brhkes.htm.

Administrative records, 1831-1958

 

LADY HOLLES’ SCHOOL see CRIPPLEGATE FOUNDATION

 

LANGBOURN WARD SCHOOL, founded in 1702, amalgamated with Cornhill and Lime Street Wards School to form Cornhill, Lime Street and Langbourn Wards School, q.v., in 1874. Ms 31177-

Administration records, 1738-1875

 

LEATHER TRADES SCHOOL, of Bethnal Green. Taken over by the City and Guilds of London Institute, q.v., in 1889. Renamed the Cordwainers’ Technical College in 1913 when the Cordwainers’ Company - see Section 18ii - assumed sole responsibility. 1886-1958. Ms 21926 and Ms 21997

 

LICENSED VICTUALLERS' SCHOOL, of Kennington (1802-1922),  Slough (1922-1980s), Ascot (1980s-). Founded by Society of Licensed Victuallers in 1802 as a school for the boys and girls of deceased or impoverished fellow traders. Now (2007) an independent day and boarding school for 900 pupils. Ms 21455-

Pupil records, 1865 (list of pupils)

Estates records, 1837-57

Administrative records, 1865-93

Part of the archives of the Society of Licensed Victuallers - see Section 21.

 

LIME STREET WARD SCHOOL see CORNHILL AND LIME STREET WARDS CHARITY SCHOOL

 

MERCHANT TAYLORS' SCHOOL, of Suffolk Lane, St Lawrence Pountney (16th century -1874); Charterhouse Square (1874-1933); Sandy Lodge, Northwood, Middlesex (1933-). Established in 1561 from Merchant Taylors’ Company’s own funds (for boys only). Ms 34270-

Pupil records, 1607/8-1955

Administrative records, 1561-1969

Part of the archives of the Merchant Taylors' Company - see Section 18 (ii).

 

MERCHANT TAYLORS' SCHOOL FOR BOYS, of Crosby, Lancashire. Established in 1619 under the will of John Harrison. Administered by the Merchant Taylors’ Company until 1909. Ms 34261-

Administrative records, 1620-65, 1848-1921

Estate records, 1619- 20th century

Part of the archives of the Merchant Taylors' Company - see Section 18 (ii).

 

MERCHANT TAYLORS' SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, of Crosby, Lancashire. Established in 1888 on the site of the old Boys’ School. Administered by the Merchant Taylors’ Company until 1909. Ms 34261-

Administrative records, 1888-1921

Estate records, 1888 - 20th century

Part of the archives of the Merchant Taylors' Company - see Section 18 (ii).

 

MIDDLE SCHOOL FOR BOYS, of Tunbridge Wells, Kent. Established by the Skinners' Company in 1887, in addition to its existing school in Tonbridge, Kent. Name changed in the twentieth century to Skinners’ School for Boys/Skinners’ School. Voluntary aided school from 1944, and in 1992 grant maintained. Currently (2007) has circa 750 pupils. Ms 30738-

Pupil records, 1887-1949

Administrative records, 1887-1971

Part of the archives of the Skinners’ Company – see Section 18 (ii).

 

MIDDLE SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, of Stamford Hill, Hackney. Established by the Skinners' Company in 1890, Name changed in the twentieth century to Skinners’ School for Girls. Voluntary aided school from 1944, and from 1972 voluntary aided comprehensive secondary school. The Company has maintained a close association. In 2004 it became a Business and Enterprise College. (2007) Circa 900 pupils. Ms 30741-

Pupil records, 1917-28

Administrative records, 1890-1956

Part of the archives of the Skinners’ Company – see Section 18 (ii).

 

MONMOUTH ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS see MONMOUTH GRAMMAR SCHOOL.

MONMOUTH GRAMMAR SCHOOL, of Monmouth, Monmouthshire, Wales. In 1613 William Jones (d.1615) gave the Haberdashers' Company money for to establish a grammar school for boys. The school was rebuilt in 1865, and the original foundation re-organised in 1891 to support a new girls' school, q.v., and elementary school, as well as another boys' grammar school in Pontypool. The elementary school and the Pontypool school were transferred to County Council control in 1940 and 1955 respectively. Monmouth School became a direct grant school in 1946 and an independent school in 1976. Ms 15852-

Pupil records, 1892-8 (scholarship registers)

Administrative records, 1613-1979

Part of the archives of the Haberdashers' Company - see Section 18 (ii).

 

MONMOUTH SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, of Monmouth, Monmouthshire, Wales. Founded in 1891 from money given by William Jones (d.1615) to the Haberdashers' Company for schooling in Monmouth (see also Monmouth Grammar School, q.v.) Monmouth School for Girls became a direct grant school in 1946 and an independent school in 1976. Ms 15852-

Pupil records, 1892-1902 (day pupil registers)

Administrative records, 1613-1979

Part of the archives of the Haberdashers' Company - see Section 18 (ii).

 

NEALE'S MATHEMATICAL SCHOOL, successively of Dorset Street, Fetter Lane and Fleet Street. Founded by will of Joseph Neale 1705 and regulated by act of Chancery dated 18 January 1715/6. Closed briefly in 1901. Reopened by 1907. Reconstituted in 1954 as Neale's Educational Foundation (still extant in 2007). Ms 6585-A, Ms 18728-9

Pupil records, 1931-40 (attendance register 1931-5, 1939-40)

Administrative records, 1924-54

Part of the parish archives of St Dunstan in the West. - see Section 16 (i).

 

OUNDLE SCHOOL of Oundle, Northamptonshire. Established by will of Sir William Laxton 1556, as a grammar school to be run by the Grocers' Company. In 1876 the school was divided into Laxton Grammar School and Oundle School, a public boarding school. The two schools were reunited in 2000. Ms 11625-

Pupil records, 1883-91 (scholarship and presentation register)

Administrative records, circa 1771-1958 (including transcribed court minutes from 1556)

Part of the archives of the Grocers' Company - see Section 18 (ii).

 

PENNOYER'S SCHOOL, Hay on Wye, Brecon. Founded by will of William Pennoyer (1670) and established in 1674. Amalgamated (between 1825 and 1833) with the National School in Hay. Ms 13520, 13524

Pupil records, 1788-98 (lists of pupils)

Estates records, 1792 (further estate records of William Pennoyer’s Charity are held) 

Administrative records, 1701-1900

Part of the archives of Christ's Hospital, q.v

 

PENNOYER'S SCHOOL, Pulham St Mary, Norfolk. William Pennoyer’s will of 1670 endowed an existing school in the chapel of St James the Lesser in Pulham. The school was closed in 1988. Ms 13520, 13524

Pupil records, 1788-98 (lists of pupils)

Estates records, 1792 (further estate records of William Pennoyer’s Charity are held) 

Administrative records, 1701-1900

Part of the archives of Christ's Hospital, q.v

 

PENNOYER'S SCHOOL, Great Alie Street, Whitechapel, Middlesex. Founded by will of William Pennoyer (1670) and established in 1674. Amalgamated circa 1880 with the Davenant School (which was established in 1680). Ms 13520, 13524

Pupil records, 1788-98 (lists of pupils)

Estates records, 1792 (further estate records of William Pennoyer’s Charity are held) 

Administrative records, 1701-1900

Part of the archives of Christ's Hospital, q.v

 

PETER JOYE'S CHARITY SCHOOL of the Tabernacle, St Ann Blackfriars. Founded by Peter Joye ca.1704 for poor boys of the parish of St Ann Blackfriars or St Andrew by the Wardrobe (constituted by deed of settlement in 1716). In 1888 the buildings were taken down and a new building erected for the vestry. The school was merged with the St Bride Foundation. Ms 01706

Pupil records, 1705-44 (admission register)

Estates records, 1611-1734

Administrative records, 1707-1892

Some of the records are part of the archives of Sion College (see Section 18i), as the president and governors of Sion College acted as trustees of the school until 1901, and some are part of the archives of the parish of St Ann Blackfriars (see Section 16i).

 

PROTESTANT DISSENTERS' CHARITY SCHOOL, of Bartholomew Court (Bartholomew Close) (1717- circa 1834); Jewin Street (1834 onwards). Established in 1717 for sons and daughters of protestant dissenters of all denominations. Ms 4847-

Pupil records, 1807-18 (pupil lists)

Administrative records, 1804-39

 

PULHAM ST MARY FREE SCHOOL, Norfolk see PENNOYER'S SCHOOL, Pulham St Mary, Norfolk

 

QUEENHITHE WARD SCHOOL. Founded in early 18th century (exact date and address unknown). Amalgamated with Vintry Ward School, q.v., in 1872 and in 1875 with Castle Baynard School, q.v. Ms 4833, Ms 22902

Administrative records, 1847-71

Part of the records of the parish of St Michael Queenhithe - see Section 16 (i).

 

RAGGED SCHOOL UNION, established 1844, name changed to the Shaftesbury Society in 1944. The Society is still in existence as of 2007. Ms 5754

Case book of notes and photographs of London boys admitted to a collecting centre, possibly at Walton-on-Thames for assisted emigrants to Canada ca.1860. N.B. facsimile volume, Ms 5754A, should usually be consulted in place of original, Ms 5754. No other records are held.

 

RATCLIFF SCHOOL, of Ratcliff Stepney (1536-1892), Tredegar Square, Mile End (1892-1971); Upminster (1971-) Established by Nicholas Gibson in 1536. Run by his wife Avice, later Lady Knyvett, after his death in 1540 until 1552 when responsibility passed to the Coopers' Company. The school united in 1892 with Coborn School to form the Coopers and Coborn School. The girl's school moved to Bow, the boys staying at Mile End. Both schools merged in 1971 on a new site in Upminster, Essex.  Ms 5604-

Estates records, 1520-1607

Administrative records, 1823-89

Part of the archives of the Coopers' Company - see Section 18 (ii)

 

RED COAT SCHOOL, of Stepney Green. Known variously as Stepney Parish Day Schools, Stepney Church School and the Charity School in the Hamlet of Mile End Old Town. It was established in 1714 for boys born within Mile End Old Town. (Girls were admitted later in the 18th century.) In 1944 the school merged with the secondary department of the Cass School, q.v., to become the Sir John Cass's Foundation and Red Coat School in Stepney Way. Ms 31189-

Pupil records, 1776-1939 (including girls’ and boys’ admission register 1776-1834 and boys’ admission register 1874-1911). Some later admission registers are held at London Metropolitan Archives.

Administration records, 1790-1971

 

RED CROSS STREET BOYS’ SCHOOL see CRIPPLEGATE SCHOOLS FOUNDATION

 

ROYAL MATHEMATICAL SCHOOL see CHRIST'S HOSPITAL

 

ST ANDREW HOLBORN CHARITY SCHOOL, of Hatton Garden. Boys’ school founded 1696; girls’ school 1700; both by voluntary subscription. Elizabeth Palmer endowed the school by will of 1726 and trustees bought land in St Giles in the Fields for income. Boys were apprenticed to trade; girls intended for domestic service. Infants’ school opened 1898. Ms 10600, Ms 14136-7, Ms 19572-A, 19752

Administrative records, 1824-1938

Estate records, 1694-1917

Part of the parish archives - see Section 16 (i).

 

ST BARTHOLOMEW THE GREAT PAROCHIAL SCHOOL. Founded by bequest of John Whiting of Tower Bridge in 1702 who endowed the school with land in Navestock and South Weald in Essex. By 1819 it was teaching 30 boys and 20 girls, probably in rooms over the church. By 1855 there were three schools, for boys, girls and infants in rooms in or adjacent to the church. In 1888 new school buildings were built at 41 and 42 Bartholomew Close.  Ms 3999-

Pupil records, 1867-72 (attendance register)

Estates records, 1627-1920.

Administrative records, 1728, 1780-1939

Part of the parish archives - see Section 16 (i).

 

ST BOTOLPH ALDGATE PAROCHIAL SCHOOL, of Victualling Office Square, east side of Little Tower Hill. Date of establishment unknown. Amalgamated (unknown date) with a school founded by Zachary Crofton on Little Tower Hill, East Smithfield circa 1665 which  was endowed by Sir Samuel Starling in 1673. Amalgamated with Billingsgate and Tower Wards School in 1905 to form the junior department of the Cass School, q.v. Ms 31138-

Pupil records, 1896-1906 (boys’ admission register 1896-1906 and log book 1899-1906)

Administration records, 1729-1905

Estate records, 1722-1895

 

ST BOTOLPH BISHOPSGATE PAROCHIAL CHARITY SCHOOL. Date of foundation and address unknown. Ms 21132

Administrative records, 1758-1800 (accounts only)

Part of the parish archives - see Section 16 (i).

 

ST BRIDE PAROCHIAL CHARITY SCHOOL, of 16 Bride Lane (from at least 1839-1936). Established in 1711 for boys and girls. New school built in 1839 when National Society system adopted. Included children of Bridewell Precinct and Whitefriars. Closed 1936. Ms 6568-9 and Ms 10098

Administrative records, 1865-1949

Part of the parish archives - see Section 16 (i).

 

ST DUNSTAN IN THE WEST PAROCHIAL SCHOOLS. Established in 1708 for boys and 1710 for girls. By 1838 the schools were held in premises in Hen and Chicken Yard, Fleet Street over the vestry clerk's office.  Ms 2972-

Pupil records, 1868-1940 (boys' admission register 1868-99, boys' attendance 1923-30, girls' admission register 1878-1939, girls' attendance 1891-1909 and 1912-40, infants' attendance 1925-33, girls’ log book 1906-39, photographs of girls 1877-1935)

Estates records, 1709-1934

Administrative records, 1609, 1632, 1771-1949

Part of the parish archives - see Section 16 (i).

 

ST GEORGE [BOTOLPH LANE?] BOYS’ SCHOOL. In Ms 31164

Pupil records 1849 (register of discharges).

Part of the archives of Tower Ward School, q.v.

 

ST GILES CRIPPLEGATE SCHOOLS see CRIPPLEGATE SCHOOLS FOUNDATION

 

ST KATHARINE BY THE TOWER SCHOOL, of St Katharine by the Tower (unknown date-1825); Regent’s Park (1825-). Date of foundation unknown. Ms 9710

Pupil records, 1859-64 (list of boys admitted)

Administrative records, 1865

Part of the archives of St Katherine by the Tower - see Section 18 (i).

 

ST LEONARD SHOREDITCH INFANTS SCHOOL. Date of foundation and address unknown. Ms 7509

Administrative records, 1837-54

Part of the parish archives - see Section 16 (i)

 

ST MARGARET PATTENS BOYS’ SCHOOL. In Ms 31164

Pupil records 1848-50 (register of discharges).

Part of the archives of Tower Ward School, q.v.

 

ST PAUL'S CATHEDRAL CHOIR SCHOOL, successively of Carter Lane (12th century onwards); St Paul’s Almonry; London House Yard; St Paul’s Bakehouse Court; Old Fish Street; St Peter’s Hill; Craven Street then Adelphi Terrace, both Charing Cross; St Paul’s Chapter House; Precentor’s House, Amen Court; Carter Lane (1875-1966, with World War II move to Truro); New Change (1967-). Date of foundation unknown, first reference is to refounding in 1127. 8 boys in school until 1872 when increased to 40. Non-singing day boys admitted from 1989, fully co-educational from 2001 onwards. Name changed in 1997 to St Paul’s Cathedral School. Restricted access to Ms 25220. Ms 25118-  

Pupil records, 1879-1972 (register of applicants, 1879-1938, and class room registers, 1968-72). Sources for earlier pupils are given in introductory note to collection.

Administrative records, 1885-1987

 

ST SEPULCHRE HOLBORN PAROCHIAL CHARITY SCHOOLS. The boys' school was established in the City part of the parish in 1700, for 51 boys. In 1702, a girls' school in the same area followed, as well as boys (1706) and girls (1711) schools in the Middlesex part of the parish. Each school was maintained by private subscription as well as bequests and donations. In the mid 19th century the schools in Middlesex were removed to premises in Greenhill Rents, before the site was purchased by the Metropolitan Railway, who allowed them to use rooms in a building in Charterhouse Square until 1872. At this point the schools in both City and Middlesex parts merged, and new buildings were constructed on part of the churchyard. In 1904 there were 107 boys, 122 girls and 91 infants being educated. Ms 3195-

Pupil records, 1861-1924 (clothed boys' attendance register 1882-96, general attendance register 1911-24, presentation of pupils (girls) lists 1861-75, girls’ log book 1863-88, boys’ log book 1863-75)

Estates records, 1916

Administrative records, 1700-1991

Part of the parish archives - see Section 16 (i).

 

SIR ANDREW JUDD’S COMMERCIAL SCHOOL, of Tonbridge, Kent. Established by the Skinners' Company in 1888, from an endowment by Sir Andrew Judd's Foundation. Soon after became known as the Judd School. In 1944 it became the first voluntary aided grammar school. Currently (2007)  has about 850 pupils, including girls in the 6th form. Ms 30740-

Pupil records, 1888-1943

Administrative records, 1888-1971

Part of the archives of the Skinners’ Company – see Section 18ii 

 

SIR JOHN CASS COLLEGE see SIR JOHN CASS TECHNICAL INSTITUTE

 

SIR JOHN CASS TECHNICAL INSTITUTE, of Jewry Street. Built, run and funded by Sir John Cass’s Foundation, q.v. It opened in 1902 in a purpose built building. Name changed in 1950 to Sir John Cass College. In 1971 the College amalgamated with the City of London College and King Edward VII Nautical Institute to become the City of London Polytechnic; in 1990 the Polytechnic, with the London College of Furniture, became London Guildhall University. Records held by Guildhall Library are mostly ledgers and accounts; minutes and other records are held by London Guildhall University. 1898-1956. Ms 31125-

Pupil records, 1902-15 (fee books)

Estates records, 1898-1938

Financial records, 1902-50

 

SIR JOHN CASS’S FOUNDATION of Aldgate (1710-62), Church Row (1762-1869) and Jewry Street (1869-). In 1710 Sir John Cass established a school for the poor children of Portsoken Ward, known as the Cass School, q.v. The funds (from estates in Hackney and Essex) were administered by Sir John Cass’s Charity. The charity’s name changed in 1895 to Sir John Cass’s Foundation. Sir John Cass Technical Institute, q.v., was opened in 1902 in Jewry Street.

Records are held of various other schools, which all amalgamated with the Cass School between 1900-1907 (details are given under the separate entry for each name): Billingsgate Ward School; Bridge, Candlewick and Dowgate Wards School; Broad Street Ward School; Cornhill and Lime Street Wards School; Langbourn Ward School; St Botolph Aldgate Parochial School; Tower Ward School

Records are also held of the Red Coat School, Stepney, q.v., which amalgamated with the secondary department of the Cass School in 1944 to become the Sir John Cass's Foundation and Red Coat School. Records are also held of (mostly educational) charities which were administered by, or had another connection with, the Foundation: Aldgate and Allhallows Barking Exhibition Foundation; Aldgate Freedom Foundation; Butler’s Charity; St Botolph Aldgate Union Fund; St Dunstan’s Educational Foundation. See Section 18iv for these charities.  Ms 31001-

Estates records, 1442-1982

Administrative records, 1720-1973

 

SIR JOHN CASS'S FOUNDATION AND RED COAT SCHOOL see RED COAT SCHOOL 

SIR ROBERT GEFFERY’S SCHOOL, of Landrake, Cornwall. Established by the Ironmongers’ Company in 1704 under the will of Sir Robert Geffery. It is now (2007) a voluntary grant aided school, although the Company are still involved with the primary school. Ms 31730, Ms 31764-5

Administrative records, 1877-1954

 

SOCIETY OF GODLY AND PIOUS PERSONS IN ST MARY LE BOW see CORNHILL AND LIME STREET WARDS SCHOOL

 

SOUTH LONDON TECHNICAL ART SCHOOL, of 122-124 Kennington Park Road (1879-1932), 118-124 Kennington Park Road (1933-). Established in 1879 by the City and Guilds of London Institute, q.v., as an extension of Lambeth Art School (founded in 1854). Renamed as the Kennington and Lambeth Art School in 1933 and the City and Guilds Art School in 1937. Control of the Art School was transferred to the City and Guilds of London Art School Ltd in 1971. L 49.5 Ms 21925, Ms 21988-96, 35818-21, 38299-303

Pupil records, 1880-1951 (including day and evening students' admission register 1930-43, index of students circa 1931-51 and applications for admission 1880-8, 1946-51)

Admin records: 1869-1971

 

TONBRIDGE SCHOOL, of Tonbridge, Kent. Founded by Sir Andrew Judd in 1553. By his will of 1558, the Skinners' Company became (and remain) governors. He  endowed the school with land in Gracechurch Street in the City of London, and in St Pancras. A small local school until the19th century when it expanded to become one of the leading public schools of England. The school was largely rebuilt from the 1860s-80s. Currently (2007) has circa 750 pupils. L Ms 30773-

Pupil records, 1817-1948

Estate records, 1825-1973

Administrative records, 1564-1977

 

TOWER HILL SCHOOL, of Plough Yard, Seething Lane. Established for 20 boys by James Hickson’s will of 1686 (bequeathing the Brewers’ Company the manor of Williatts in South Mimms, Middlesex, to support charitable causes). The school was rebuilt in 1750, and again in 1851. Administered from 1894 by the Aldgate and Allhallows Barking Exhibition Foundation (see Section 18 iv) which included Brewers' Company representatives. Ms 5458-

Pupil records, 1724, 1889 (pupil list 1724, and admission applications 1889)

Estates records, late 19th century-1918

Administrative records, 1687-1889

Part of the archives of the Brewers' Company - see Section 18 (ii).

 

TOWER WARD SCHOOL of 91 Great Tower Street (1808-46); 9 Black Raven Court (1846-74). Founded by voluntary subscription in 1707 for girls and in 1709 for boys. United with the Billingsgate Ward School in 1874 to form the Billingsgate and Tower Wards School, q.v. Ms 1452-

Pupil records, 1853-82 (boys’ attendance register 1853-4, girls' attendance register 1872-82, pupil list 1874)

Estates records, 1846

Administrative records, 1836-62

Part of Tower ward records - see Section 11 (ii).

 

TROTMAN'S SCHOOL, Bunhill Row (17th century-1883); City Road (1883-99). Established under will of  Throckmorton Trotman (1663) who bequeathed £2000 to Haberdashers' Company to build and endow a school. A school was built on land purchased by the Company in Bunhill Row. The school took boys from the parish of St Giles Cripplegate, and, after its establishment as a parish, from St Luke's Old Street. In 1819 there were only 12 boys being educated. Closed in 1899, and money from the bequest diverted to other schools supported by the Company. Ms 15901-

Pupil records, 1844-99 (admission register).

Administrative records, 1827-1979

Part of the archives of the Haberdashers' Company - see Section 18 (ii).

 

TURNER'S FREE SCHOOL FOR POOR BOYS of 1 White Lion Street (Folgate Street) to 1775, 4 Primrose street, Bishopsgate (1775-1880). This school, previously known as Norton Folgate Charity School, was endowed by will of Richard Turner 1768 and became known as Turner’s Free School thereafter. In 1880 the school closed and funds went to establish the Turner Exhibition Fund, instead (see Section 18iv). Ms 10754-

Pupil records, 1769-1832 (admission register)

Estates records, 1775-1835

Administrative records, 1711-1880

 

VINTRY WARD SCHOOL. Date of foundation unknown. Boys’ school was at Brickhill Lane, off Upper Thames Street circa 1842. The school merged with Queenhithe Ward School , q.v., in 1972 and that school merged with Castle Baynard Ward School, q.v., in 1875. Ms 6432 and Ms 15454

Estates records, 1842

Administrative records, 1730

Part of the archives of the Vintners' Company - see Section 18 (ii).

 

WAPPING CHARITY SCHOOL. (Date of foundation and address unknown) Ms 2654

Administrative records, 1794-1897 (apprenticeship fund accounts only)

 

WEIGH HOUSE BOYS' CHARITY SCHOOL, City Road. (Date of foundation unknown). Ms 2475

Pupil records, 1788-1804 (pupil lists)

Administrative records, 1788-1813

 

WHITECHAPEL FREE SCHOOL see PENNOYER’S SCHOOL, Great Alie Street, Whitechapel

 

WITNEY GRAMMAR SCHOOL, of Witney, Oxfordshire. Built by Henry Box in 1660, who died (in 1662) before he had endowed it. Mary Box, his widow, transferred the governance of the school to the Grocers' Company in 1670, in accordance with his will. The school was endowed with estates in Longworth, Berkshire. It was established to provide classical education to thirty boys, giving priority to those of Witney or founder's kin. The Company acted as governors until 1902, but still maintains an active association. The school is now known as the Henry Box School. Ms 11631-

Administrative records, 1675-1863

Part of the archives of the Grocers' Company - see Section 18 (ii).


Last updated 29 January 2009

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