Time in History

Views of Time from Prehistory to the Present Day
Author(s): 
Whitrow, G.J.
ISBN: 
0192852116
Date published: 
January 1989
Paperback
Price: 
£7.99
Pages: 
228

It seems the more accurately we are able to measure time, the more we worry about it and the more it dominates our lives. However, most of us are so accustomed to the ideas of time, history, and evolution that we forget that these concepts have not always been perceived in the way they are today. This fascinating book traces the evolution of our general awareness of time and its significance from the dawn of history to the present day. G. J. Whitrow's absorbing narrative examines not only the development of our methods of measuring time, from the formulation of early calendars to the standardization of time-keeping throughout the world, but also discusses the way in which our changing concept of time has influenced history itself. `No one is better qualified than G. J. Whitrow to review ideas of time down the ages ... an admirable survey, authoritative and readable, of the evolution of our awareness of time and our methods of measuring it.' TLS

 

Now reissued in new covers, G. J. Whitrow's fascinating book traces the evolution of our general awareness of time and its significance from the dawn of history to the present day. His absorbing narrative examines not only the development of our methods of measuring time, but also discusses the way in which our changing concept of time has influenced history itself.

This fascinating book traces the evolution of our general awareness of time and its significance from the dawn of history to the present day. G. J. Whitrow's absorbing narrative examines not only the development of our methods of measuring time, from the formulation of early calendars to the standardization of time-keeping throughout the world, but also discusses the way in which our changing concept of time has influenced history itself.

Readable introduction to the ways time has been measured and our changing awareness of time

Detailed appendices on leap years, calendars, and the calculation of Easter

 

`essential reading for anyone fascinated by time' New Scientist