Globalization, Negotiation, and the Failure of Transformation in South Africa

Author(s): 
Allen, Michael H.
ISBN: 
1403971412
Date published: 
April 2006
Hardback
Pages: 
252

Globalization, Negotiation, and the Failure of Transformation in South Africa considers the consequences of the coincidence of two revolutions in South Africa at the end of the Cold War. One was the completion of decolonization in Africa, with the advent of African majority rule and democracy in South Africa in 1994. The other was the emergence of the global mode of production as the pre-eminent form of organization in world political economy, that was to force revisions of prior assumptions about development strategies, international diplomacy, nation-building, class struggle and gender relations in all parts of the world. The book explains the social forces, forms of consciousness and structural constraints that undermined Apartheid, preserved national unity and yet, later constrained democratic sovereignty, as the imperatives of global markets clashed with the prior aspirations of the democratic revolution. A unique theoretical synthesis from several critical perspectives, informs this study of South African political economy up to the early years of the Twenty-first century.