Diplomatic History

As the sole journal devoted to the history of U.S. diplomacy, foreign relations, and national security, Diplomatic History examines issues from the colonial period to the present in a global and comparative context. The journal of record of The Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations (SHAFR), Diplomatic History offers a variety of perspectives on economic and strategic issues, as well as those involving gender, culture, ethnicity, and ideology. This journal appeals to readers from a wide variety of disciplines, including American studies, international economics, American history, national security studies, and Latin American, Asian, African, and European studies.

Five times a year: January, April, June, October, November.

Publisher: 
Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN (print): 
0145-2096
ISSN (online): 
1467-7709

Latest articles

Volume 36 (4)

The United States and the Curious History of Self-Determination*
BRAD SIMPSON, vol. 36 (4): 675-694
Introduction: Gender and Sexuality in American Foreign Relations
KATHERINE A. S. SIBLEY, vol. 36 (4): 695-698
“Now You Are Alone:” Anticommunism, Gender, and the Cold War Myths of Hede Massing andWhittaker Chambers
VERONICA A. WILSON, vol. 36 (4): 699-722
The Lavender Scare and Empire: Rethinking Cold War Antigay Politics*
NAOKO SHIBUSAWA , vol. 36 (4): 723-752
Pamela Churchill, Wartime London, and the Making of the Special RelationshipPamela Churchill, Wartime London, and the Making of the Special Relationship
FRANK COSTIGLIOLA, vol. 36 (4): 753-762
The Personal and the Political: Gender and Sexuality in Diplomatic History
ROBERT DEAN, vol. 36 (4): 763-767
Personal, Political, and International: A Reflection on Diplomacy and Methodology
LAURA MCENANEY, vol. 36 (4): 769-772
Fighting Culture with Culture
FREDERICK R. DICKINSON, vol. 36 (4): 773-775
Advantages and Human Costs of Military Empire
DONNA ALVAH, vol. 36 (4): 777-779
Reassessing the Cold War
MELVYN P. LEFFLER, vol. 36 (4): 781-783

Volume 36 (3)

Place Matters: Domestic Regionalism and the Formation of American Foreign Policy*
JOSEPH A. FRY, vol. 36 (3): 451-482
What Constitutes a Region?
LAURA F. EDWARDS, vol. 36 (3): 483-486
Creating a “Respectable Area”: Southerners andthe Cold War
KARI FREDERICKSON, vol. 36 (3): 487-490
Andrew Fry and Regionalism, Honor, and War
BERTRAM WYATT-BROWN, vol. 36 (3): 491-493
Texas and the History of American Foreign Policy
WALTER BUENGER, vol. 36 (3): 495-498
Of Derma and Diplomacy: “Place Matters” and American Diplomatic History
MITCHELL LERNER, vol. 36 (3): 499-503
Fencing in the Past
PATTY LIMERICK, vol. 36 (3): 505-509
The Adventures of Lumping, Splitting, and Preparing Matzo Ball Soup
JOSEPH A. FRY, vol. 36 (3): 511-514
“A Very Pleasant Way to Die”: Radiation Effects and the Decision to Use the Atomic Bomb against Japan*
SEAN L. MALLOY, vol. 36 (3): 515-545
“We Don't Want a Munich”: Hanoi's Diplomatic Strategy, 1965–1968
PIERRE ASSELIN, vol. 36 (3): 547-581