Family & Community History

Family & Community History brings together historical and geographical approaches to communities and families in the past, setting them in an awareness of the importance of place. Places provide the raw material for testing wider generalizations about the past and the journal explores the ways in which studies of local places can extend academic and theoretical contexts. In pursuit of this aim we believe a range of methodological approaches can be applied to the study of past communities, including micro-studies, oral history and qualitative research as well as quantitative studies.

We define family and community history in a broad sense. Family can include studies of family and household structures, personal and family life cycles, family roles, kin relationships and migration. Community history can encompass social networks and structures, paid and unpaid work and religious, occupational, political or other voluntary-based communities. The focus is on the history of the UK and Ireland from the 18th to 20th centuries, although the journal will publish articles on other areas and places where they make a clear comparative or methodological contribution.

The journal is peer-reviewed and combines scholarly methods and presentation with an emphasis on accessibility and an openness to independent as well as institutionally-based researchers.

Family & Community History is the journal of the Family and Community Historical Research Society which aims to promote and communicate research in family and community history within a scholarly framework and to encourage links between institutionally-based and independent researchers.

Publisher: 
Maney Publishing
ISSN (print): 
1463-1180
ISSN (online): 
1751-3812

Latest articles

Volume 18 (2)

EDITORIAL
vol. 18 (2): 89-103
POVERTY, EMIGRATION AND FAMILY: EXPERIENCING CHILDHOOD POVERTY IN LATE NINETEENTH-CENTURY MANCHESTER
Steven J Taylor, vol. 18 (2): 89-103
CONSTRUCTING THE DISABLED CHILD IN ENGLAND, 1800–1860
Steven King, vol. 18 (2): 104-121
PICTURES OF PETER PAN: INSTITUTIONS, LOCAL DEFINITIONS OF ‘MENTAL DEFICIENCY’, AND THE FILTERING OF CHILDREN IN EARLY TWENTIETH-CENTURY ENGLAND
Rebecca Wynter, vol. 18 (2): 122-138
JOURNAL NEWS AUTUMN 2015
vol. 18 (2): 122-138
INSANE INNOCENTS: MAD CHILDREN IN BENEDICT OF PETERBOROUGH’S MIRACULA SANCTI THOMAE CANTUARIENSIS
Claire Trenery, vol. 18 (2): 139-155
BOOK REVIEWS
vol. 18 (2): 160-171

Volume 18 (1)

Editorial
vol. 18 (1): 1-2
MEN OF YESTERDAY: LANCASTER POOR LAW UNION, 1870–1911
Neil Quinn, vol. 18 (1): 3-23
‘A CITY THAT WE SHALL NEVER FIND’? THE SEARCH FOR A COMMUNITY OF FELLOW PROGRESSIVE SPIRITS IN THE UK BETWEEN THE WARS
Lesley A. Hall, vol. 18 (1): 24-36
‘IF ONE MEMBER OF THE FAMILY IS DISABLED THE FAMILY AS A WHOLE IS DISABLED’: THALIDOMIDE CHILDREN AND THE EMERGENCE OF THE FAMILY CARER IN BRITAIN, C.1957–1978
Claire Sewell, vol. 18 (1): 37-52
THE FOUNDLING HOSPITAL AND ITS TOKEN SYSTEM
Gillian Clark, vol. 18 (1): 53-68
Society News
vol. 18 (1): 69-70
Book Reviews
vol. 18 (1): 71-86

Volume 17 (2)

Editorial
Steve King, vol. 17 (2): 85-85
HOW DID THE POOR COPE WITH ILLNESS: PERSPECTIVES FROM EARLY NINETEENTH-CENTURY OXFORD
Richard Dyson, vol. 17 (2): 86-100
‘A STUBBORN, INTRACTABLE BODY’: RESISTANCE TO THE WORKHOUSE IN WALES, 1834–1877
Megan Evans, vol. 17 (2): 101-121
THE MEDICALISATION OF A PARISH WORKHOUSE IN GEORGIAN WESTMINSTER: ST MARTIN IN THE FIELDS, 1725–1824
J. Boulton, vol. 17 (2): 122-140
Society News
vol. 17 (2): 141-143
Book Reviews
vol. 17 (2): 144-155