Terrae Incognitae: The Journal of the Society for the History of Discoveries

Terrae Incognitae is an interdisciplinary, peer-reviewed journal published for the Society for the History of Discoveries. The aim is to examine the history and impact of geographic exploration and cross-cultural interaction around the globe prior to the modern era. Each issue includes an expansive book review section.  Recent articles have ranged from the use of DNA technology to track the movement of chickens and thus populations in pre-historic Oceania to the role of the Order of Christ in furthering 16th-century Portuguese expansion; from the significance of inter-cultural adoption or rejection of clothing for understanding cross-cultural interaction to Marco Polo’s influence on cartography.

Terrae Incognitae accepts contributions relating to geographic exploration and its impact from all chronologies before the modern era and relating to any part of the globe.  The journal welcomes comparative and interdisciplinary studies as well as those focused on a particular time or place.

The origin of geographic discovery and exploration is lost to the mist of time—perhaps when an early hominid went searching for game and discovered another group of humans. Geographic discovery is about more than the moment of discovery, however. It is about theoretical geography put into practice; it is about bankrolling expeditions, whether through the investment of wealthy widows, old age pensions, financiers, or governments; it is about maps and mapmakers; it is about diplomats, missionaries, explorers, scalawags and pirates, naturalists, and merchant-adventurers. Geographic discovery is about people broadening their horizons, encountering one another for the first time, struggling to understand a foreign culture, and braving the unknown in search of a new destiny.

Publisher: 
Maney Publishing
ISSN (print): 
0082-2884
ISSN (online): 
2040-8706

Latest articles

Volume 53 (2)

The Diffusion of Labour-Saving Technology and Technological Innovations: English Reaping Machines in Scotland 1850 to 1910
Heather Holmes, vol. 53 (2): 89-121
The Diffusion of Labour-Saving Technology and Technological Innovations: English Reaping Machines in Scotland 1850 to 1910
Heather Holmes, vol. 53 (2): 89-121
Panniers to Stiff Carts: Early Farm Transport in the Isle of Man
Chris Page, vol. 53 (2): 122-150
Panniers to Stiff Carts: Early Farm Transport in the Isle of Man
Chris Page, vol. 53 (2): 122-150
The Double Vision of ‘Natural Man’
Neil Lanham, vol. 53 (2): 151-171
The Double Vision of ‘Natural Man’
Neil Lanham, vol. 53 (2): 151-171
Cotqueans, Poultry-Gropers, Dish-Clouts
J.B. Smith, vol. 53 (2): 172-175
Reviews
vol. 53 (2): 176-188

Volume 53 (1)

Tracking Change: Lily-of-the-Valley Custom and Festival in France
Cozette Griffin-Kremer, vol. 53 (1): 1-18
Dreg Songs Lost … and Found
Robert Young Walser, vol. 53 (1): 19-35
The Italian Contribution to Manchester
Anthony Rea, vol. 53 (1): 36-56
Perceptions of Welshness: Tourists’ Impressions of the Material and Traditional Culture of Wales, 1770–1840
Michael Freeman, vol. 53 (1): 57-71
Reviews
vol. 53 (1): 72-81
Edward Fletcher Cass
Caroline Oates, vol. 53 (1): 82-85
Paddy MacMonagle (1920–2014)
Michael Larkin, vol. 53 (1): 86-88

Volume 52 (2)

A Fistful of Bladdernuts: The Shifting Uses of Staphylea pinnata L. as Documented by Archaeology, History, and Ethnology
Andreas G. Heiss, vol. 52 (2): 95-136
A Singular Changeling?
Linda-May Ballard, vol. 52 (2): 137-151
‘To keep the Devil at bay’? Ephemeral Floor Decoration in Wales during the Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries
Eurwyn Wiliam, vol. 52 (2): 152-175
Reviews
vol. 52 (2): 176-185