Historical skills courses

An introduction to oral history

Course date(s): 
10 Jan 2017 to 21 Mar 2017
This course is a comprehensive introduction to the theory and practice of oral history. Participants will learn though classroom teaching and practical sessions how to conduct their own interviews. As well as addressing theoretical and methodological issues, An Introduction to Oral History will help students to develop practical skills in interviewing, recording, and the organisation and preservation of oral material.

Databases for Historians: Research Analysis and Data Processing

Course date(s): 
18 Aug 2017
This practical one-day workshop explores the need for good quality data in historical research, how to achieve this, and how to perform and present analysis based on historical research questions. A number of topics are addressed, primarily focusing on a broad range of querying techniques including: qualitative and quantitative analyses; the moving, shaping and programmatic altering of data; the automated generation of dependent and conditional data values; and the presentation and publication of research analyses in different formats. A reasonable familiarity with data modelling and common database tools is required.

Day School in Local History, Winter 2017

Course date(s): 
23 Feb 2017


The Institute of Historical Research is delighted to announce the return of its training programme for local historians, now in its sixth year. In 2017 we have a brand new format; we shall be holding two day schools: a winter school in February, which will cover local history in general, and a summer school in July, devoted specifically to London history.

Day School in London History, Summer 2017

Course date(s): 
20 Jul 2017
The London History Day School is presented in association with the Centre for Metropolitan History (CMH) and will feature tutors from the principal archives and research units concerned with London. We shall cover the incredibly rich and abundant history of London and its surrounding area, exploring both its identity as a capital city but also the special qualities of its many constituent towns, vilages and suburbs. Participants will have ample opportunities to discuss their own work with each other and with the experts; the aim is to provide a showcase for London local history and a forum for the exchange of ideas, views and approaches.

Explanatory paradigms: an introduction to historical theory

Course date(s): 
26 Apr 2017 to 28 Jun 2017
This course aims to provide a critical introduction to some of the most influential frameworks of explanation in historical work today. Taught on Wednesday evenings (5.30-7.00) by Professor John Tosh, Dr John Seed and Professor Sally Alexander, Explanatory Paradigms will explore one explanatory approach each week in depth through a combination of a lecture and seminar discussion based on the students’ own reading.