Historical skills courses

An introduction to oral history

Course date(s): 
12 Jan 2016 to 22 Mar 2016
This course is a comprehensive introduction to the theory and practice of oral history. Participants will learn though classroom teaching and practical sessions how to conduct their own interviews. As well as addressing theoretical and methodological issues, An Introduction to Oral History will help students to develop practical skills in interviewing, recording, and the organisation and preservation of oral material.

Explanatory paradigms: an introduction to historical theory

Course date(s): 
27 Apr 2016 to 29 Jun 2016
This course aims to provide a critical introduction to some of the most influential frameworks of explanation in historical work today. Taught on Wednesday evenings (5.30-7.00) by Professor John Tosh, Dr John Seed and Professor Sally Alexander, Explanatory Paradigms will explore one explanatory approach each week in depth through a combination of a lecture and seminar discussion based on the students’ own reading.

Historical citation

Course date(s): 
10 Nov 2015
This half-day workshop explains the theory and practice of correct referencing by historians. It explores the different citation systems historians use and explains when, where and how to cite sources and authorities both manually and using citation management software.

Historical Mapping and Geographical Information Systems

Course date(s): 
3 Dec 2015 to 4 Dec 2015
5 May 2016 to 6 May 2016
The ‘spatial turn’ is now well established in history and scholars, publishers and readers now frequently expect to see space to be used as a category of analysis, maps used as sources, and research illustrated with custom maps. However, without training in geographical techniques, tools, and even terminology, it can be challenging for historians to begin to work with this material. This two day course is designed to first introduce the history and concepts of mapping, along with the most basic ways of producing your own maps, before then moving on to a second day focusing on ArcGIS, the industry standard software for map analysis and production.

Law and Ethics for Social Science, Humanities and Legal Research

Course date(s): 
4 Dec 2015
What kind of content could provoke a libel claim? What does the ‘right to be forgotten’ mean for archival material? What rights do citizens have to access academic data under the Freedom of Information Act? How can academics use freedom of information and data protection law for their own research? Is it possible to protect the identity of a source? These and many more questions will be addressed at this one-day intensive training course on the legal and ethical issues that researchers in the social sciences and humanities and law could encounter during the course of their social research.