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Explanatory paradigms: an introduction to historical theory

Course date(s): 
14 May 2014 to 16 Jul 2014
This course aims to provide a critical introduction to some of the most influential frameworks of explanation in historical work today. Taught on Wednesday evenings (5.30-7.00) by Professor John Tosh, Dr John Seed and Professor Sally Alexander, Explanatory Paradigms will explore one explanatory approach each week in depth through a combination of a lecture and seminar discussion based on the students’ own reading.

Freedom of information: a practical guide for historians

Course date(s): 
10 Apr 2013
The Freedom of Information Act 2000 dramatically altered arrangements for access to information held by public bodies, vastly widening opportunities for researchers of all sorts. Historians increasingly are using FoI requests to obtain sources that traditionally would have been inaccessible for long periods, but there is an art to using the Act creatively and drafting requests which will be met fully and promptly by the authorities. Taught by Andrew Flinn from UCL, this one-day workshop details the rights of the historian under FoI provisions, considers the theoretical implications of increased access and explains how to compose the most successful FoI requests.

Historians and their Data: a Workshop Exploring Best Practice for Research Data Management in History

Course date(s): 
14 Apr 2014
Managing digital data is a critical skill for anyone conducting research in History. Whether you are an individual scholar or a partner in a large collaborative project, the way in which you collect, organise and manage your data will have a big impact on your research. It will affect the ways in which you can ask questions of your data and consequently it will influence your interpretation. Further, it will affect your ability to verify your conclusions at a later date as well as inhibit the potential to re-use and share the data. Your data might consist of oral history recordings, images of ancient artefacts, economic and social statistical data or transcribed copies of archive documents. Irrespective of where your data comes from and what form it takes, it will be the bedrock of your research and so it is important that you look after it!

Historic Gardens: Research in Action

Course date(s): 
13 May 2014 to 1 Jul 2014
This course provides an introduction to how archival research findings on historic gardens can contribute to garden restoration, conservation and management. Taught on Tuesday mornings (11.00-13.00), Historic Gardens: Research in Action adopts a case-study approach to the exploration of these relationships through a combination of lectures, seminar-based discussions and site visits.

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