Forthcoming courses

How to Broadcast your Research: Media Training for Historians

Course date(s): 
4 Nov 2014
Are you looking to increase your media profile? Do you stumble and fumble when in front of a camera? Are you protective about your research wary of handing over all your hard work to some enquiring TV researcher? This one-day media training course, run by the IHR in association with GradTrain, is especially designed for academics and PGRs who are interested in engaging with the media at all levels.

Databases for historians I

Course date(s): 
11 Nov 2014 to 14 Nov 2014
This 4-day course is an introduction to the theory and practice of constructing and using databases. Taught via a mixture of formal lectures and 'hands-on' practical classes, the session will introduce a wide range of skills and techniques, showing how to design and build a database appropriate to the needs of your project, and illustrating how this will help to guide and expand your analysis.

Methods and sources for historical research

Course date(s): 
17 Nov 2014 to 21 Nov 2014
This course aims to equip historical researchers with the skills they will need to find and gain access to all the primary source materials they need for their projects. Over the course of a week (Mon-Fri), participants will learn, through an intensive programme of lectures and visits to repositories in and around London, how to combine online tools and traditional archival search techniques to locate and obtain evidence. Institutions visited will include the British Library, the National Archives and a number of other major national repositories in addition to a wide range of smaller and more specialised archives. The course is primarily aimed at those engaged in research degrees in history or kindred disciplines, but is open to all researchers wishing to expand their skills and knowledge in original source materials.

Historical Mapping and Geographical Information Systems

Course date(s): 
25 Nov 2014
Researchers increasingly see the value of including mapping in their work, but the software used for creating maps - Geographic Information Systems (GIS) – can do much more than simply create maps as illustrations. GIS is being used in a variety of contexts to make sense of information with a spatial component, be it at the level of buildings and streets or at the level of nations, and to perform sophisticated geospatial and topographical analyses. Historians approaching their work with geographical research questions in mind not only have to come to terms with the cartographical and technical learning curves that come with the use of GIS, but they also have to address the added complication of changing geographical ‘units’ (both administrative boundaries and physical topography) over time. Fortunately, these complexities can be overcome, turning GIS into an extremely powerful research tool.

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