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ISSN 1749-8155

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Review Date: 
31 Jul 2014

This is a most welcome volume for a number of reasons. For a start, it is the most nuanced and comprehensive study of the practice of intercession in the earlier Middle Ages, focusing on the ninth and tenth centuries. More to the point, perhaps, it constitutes the first (and to date only) sustained engagement with the diplomas of the Ottonian and Salian rulers available in English.

Review Date: 
20 Jun 2013

As medieval English kings go, William I has been well-served by his modern English biographers. D.C.

Review Date: 
27 Sep 2012

This dense, lengthy and – by the author’s own admission – ‘very difficult’ book (p. xi) tackles complex questions of power in one of the most contested and formative periods of Frankish history, between the death of Louis the Pious and the formal accession of the Capetians as kings of West Francia.

Review Date: 
6 Sep 2012

Historians have great cause to be grateful to the precocious bureaucrats of medieval England, whose records they have exploited to shed light on so many aspects of the past. They should be equally thankful for the generations of scholars who have produced printed calendars of such records since the foundation of the Record Commission in 1800.

Review Date: 
1 May 2011

This book examines the emergence and nature of the medieval kingdom of Norway. Professor Sverre Bagge’s study commences in the late 9th century when the earliest poetic sources first tell of one ruler, King Harald Fairhair, who extended his authority over coastal Norway at the expense of other regional rulers.

Review Date: 
1 Apr 2011

The Henry III Fine Rolls project has delivered a new on-line edition of the surviving fine rolls from the reign of Henry III, king of England (1216–72).

Review Date: 
1 Jun 2010

David Rollison has written a remarkable work of social and political history: vertiginously ambitious, A Commonwealth of the People showcases England’s constitutional and economic development from the 11th to the 17th century within world histories of nationalism, democratization, and globalization. ‘My subject’, he writes, ‘is the emergence of a “civilization”’ (p. 16).

Review Date: 
31 May 2010

Helen Lacey’s excellent book appears at a time when the exercise of executive and judicial clemency has become a topical talking point.

Review Date: 
1 Nov 2009

The Blackwell Companions to British History enjoy a reputation for quality of scholarship, clarity of text and range.

Review Date: 
30 Apr 2009

“Justice being taken away, then, what are kingdoms but great robberies?” – Augustine, City of God, IV.4.

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