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ISSN 1749-8155

Review Date: 
31 Jan 2007

Forty years ago last autumn, Cornell University Press published a revised and expanded dissertation, The Problem of Slavery in Western Culture (1).

Review Date: 
1 Jan 2007

Peter Mangold provides here a witty account of the relationship between two statesmen who at the apogee of their careers were respectively British prime minister and president of the French Fifth Republic.

Review Date: 
1 Jan 2007

Until relatively recently the in-depth historical analysis of Scottish women’s lives has been the preserve of dedicated gender historians. Although it is fair to say that Scottish historians have recently begun to include the lives of women in their research, this is by no means extensive.

Review Date: 
31 Dec 2006

Early-modern Europe (here covering the years from 1492 to 1750) was constantly beset by plagues of all kinds. Scarcely a year passed in western Europe until the 1720s without an outbreak of ‘pestilence’, and scarcely a decade without a major epidemic that killed ten, twenty, or even forty per cent of the community. Expansion brought with it new dangers.

Review Date: 
31 Dec 2006

Euan Cameron, former Professor of Early Modern History at the University of Newcastle, now Henry Luce III Professor of Reformation Church History at Union Theological Seminary in New York, has written a fascinating and, in many ways, remarkable study.

Review Date: 
31 Dec 2006

This is a stimulating and engaging study that ticks a great many (postcolonial scholars’) ‘boxes’.

Review Date: 
31 Dec 2006

For an outsider contemplating historiography on the early middle ages, it is a tribute to the subject’s vitality that a book of over nine-hundred pages of text should claim to be less than a definitive statement and aims ‘only to provide the raw material for a better synthesis to do so in the future’. The rather appealing modesty is misplaced.

Review Date: 
31 Dec 2006

How does one find information about an author, an anonymous text, or a genre of writing from a particular region in the middle ages? Where does one search for writers of saints’ lives, authors of diaries or letters, historians, and chroniclers?

Review Date: 
31 Dec 2006

There is a traditional, whiggish, account of toleration in early-modern England that sees it as the polar opposite of persecution, and charts its gradual triumph over its evil antithesis.

Review Date: 
1 Dec 2006

A new book by Greg Walker, Professor of Early Modern Literature and Culture at the University of Leicester, is a major event.

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