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ISSN 1749-8155

Review Date: 
31 Oct 2007

On 15 February 1921, in the city of Cork, Ireland, a military court consisting of three British Army officers assembled for the purpose of inquiring into the death of a local man the previous evening.

Review Date: 
31 Oct 2007

Before the 1980s, the powerful link between empire and race was marginalised in British imperial history. The postcolonial 'turn' opened up new ways of exploring racial constructions of colonised subjects and stimulated debate over the extent to which representations of the colonised in colonial discourse underpinned imperial power.

Review Date: 
31 Oct 2007

This impressive study examines the consequences for land tenure in England of William of Normandy's conquest of the country, glossed by his claim to have succeeded to the throne by the bequest of King Edward. Yet he believed, in line with French practice, that he became king at the moment of consecration, after which he could legitimately grant lands to his followers.

Review Date: 
31 Aug 2007

Psychological Subjects ‘is a book about how twentieth-century Britons viewed both themselves and their world in psychological terms.

Review Date: 
31 Aug 2007

The anti-imperialist credentials of Nicholas Dirks are beyond dispute.

Review Date: 
31 Aug 2007

Bishops, in theory the central figures in the Anglo-Saxon Church, have received polarized, and sometimes unbalanced, treatment from its historians.

Review Date: 
31 Aug 2007

A new book on Henry VII is a major event. The last full-length study of the king and his reign, by S. B. Chrimes, was written in 1972, in a very different historiographical world. At that time, the explosion of interest in later-medieval history was still in its infancy, and the decades after 1485 were seen mainly through the lens of the 'Tudor Revolution in Government'.

Review Date: 
31 Aug 2007

On 17 May 1940, in a unique display of vulnerability and anguish, Neville Chamberlain confided to his sisters that his whole world had 'tumbled to bits in a moment' (p. 434). Clearly in shock from his 'tremendous reverse of fortunes' (p. 1), he lamented: 'There is no pleasure in life and no prospect of any' (p. 434).

Review Date: 
31 Aug 2007

This is a significant and provocative book about the early Quakers and their use of print in England from late 1652 to the end of 1656. It begins with an argument: 'Quakers were highly engaged with contemporary political and religious affairs, and were committed in very practical ways to the establishment of Christ's kingdom on earth' (p. 1).

Review Date: 
31 Aug 2007

The fate of Jews in post-war Europe is a subject which has been neglected by historians both in the West and in areas previously under Soviet control.

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