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ISSN 1749-8155

Review Date: 
1 Nov 2003

Customs and Excise is the second major study to appear in as many years that investigates the impact of trade policy on the development of British industry.

Review Date: 
1 Nov 2003

Elizabeth Freke has the distinction among my autobiographical acquaintance of being the memoirist I would least like to meet. This is not because she was toothless, lame, blind and probably bald and, as she said in 1711, 'a diseased criple with a rhumatisme and tisick confined to a chair for this eighteen months past' (p.158).

Review Date: 
31 Oct 2003

Professor John Kent brings a distinguished reputation as a historian of religion in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Britain to the near-impossible task of saying something new about John Wesley.

Review Date: 
1 Oct 2003

Margaret of Anjou, unlike most medieval queens, has been the subject of many biographies over the centuries but Helen E. Maurer's feminist approach to the queen's political life offers a substantially new presentation of Henry VI's queen.

Review Date: 
1 Oct 2003

This collection of essays arises out of the 2001 Neale lecture at University College, London by Joanna Innes and the colloquium that followed it.  Although the Neale lecture is in British history, this book is very much a work of parliamentary history, catholic enough to extend its deliberations to considerati

Review Date: 
1 Oct 2003

The two works under review are on broadly the same subject - writing by women in later medieval England - but could not be more different and are therefore difficult to compare directly. One author is an historian, the other a literary scholar.

Review Date: 
1 Oct 2003

That religion played a significant role in the Cold War might seem self-evident, given the atheistic nature of communism and the powerful influence of Christianity on the lives of millions of people on both sides of the Iron Curtain.

Review Date: 
1 Oct 2003

Alcohol is one aspect of twentieth-century British popular culture that has received comparatively little attention.

Review Date: 
1 Sep 2003

It is refreshing to be told by William Hagen that 'refractoriness and insubordination proved to be Prussian virtues'.(p. 645) This statement would not be surprising about nineteenth-century Prussian working-class culture, but it is about early modern nobles and peasants.

Review Date: 
1 Sep 2003

Luxury in the Eighteenth Century is a welcome collection of essays on a very important topic.

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