Covering books and digital resources across all fields of history
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ISSN 1749-8155

Browse all Reviews

Review Date: 
28 Feb 2010

Although Irish nationalism in its various phases has been the subject of numerous studies, its 19th-century antithesis – British unionism – has been comparatively neglected.

Review Date: 
28 Feb 2010

This is a beautifully illustrated book of serious scholarship and the three editors and the other contributing authors are to be congratulated.

Review Date: 
28 Feb 2010

When A. J. P. Taylor undertook the final volume of the old Oxford History of England, it was ‘England’, not ‘History’, which he found the problematic part of his brief.(1) The volume under review is the latest contribution to the New Oxford History of England, and how things have changed since Taylor’s day.

Review Date: 
1 Mar 2010

Peter Wilson’s monumental history of the Thirty Years War is a work which impresses the reader both by the author’s unrivalled command of detail and by the balanced account he gives of the main events and episodes of the war.

Review Date: 
1 Mar 2010

This issue contains 11 articles by leading scholars of the reign, together with the guest editor’s introduction (in addition to his two articles), and an impressively extensive bibliography of primary and secondary sources including unpublished theses.

Review Date: 
28 Feb 2010

In this book, Tonio Andrade tells the story of a wild and uncultivated island originally inhabited by aboriginal hunters and traders.

Review Date: 
31 Jan 2010

Globalization, some have argued, has created a borderless world by breaking down the physical barriers to the movement of people, products and ideas. Technological advance further facilitates the free circulation of information. Despite their obsession with the past, historians, archivists and publishers in the history field have not been slow to embrace the new digital technology.

Review Date: 
31 Jan 2010

This book is dedicated to Edward M. Peters, well known to medievalists for his wide-ranging work in many fields, often closely related the law and the illicit.

Review Date: 
1 Feb 2010

Among the challenges that define teaching the history of Britain to undergraduates, those presented by national context are perhaps the most complex.

Review Date: 
31 Jan 2010

The Rule of Women in Early Modern Europe is a collection of papers which originated in a 2005 conference at the University of Miami. The women examined in the essays include queens regnant, consorts and various regents all of whom exercised power either in their own right or through their marital or familial ties.

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