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ISSN 1749-8155

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Review Date: 
1 May 2011

Land, Law and People in Medieval Scotland is best viewed as six self-contained studies under two broad headings: ‘Land and law’ and ‘Land and people’.

Review Date: 
1 Dec 2010

Happiness is researching someone with a unique name. At least, that’s the case in the research environment created by the brilliant new resource, London Lives 1690–1800 – Crime, Poverty and Social Policy in the Metropolis.

Review Date: 
1 Nov 2010

Can we conceive of a peculiarly ‘late medieval’ notion of family?

Review Date: 
1 Nov 2010

What can we know about late-medieval, pre-Reformation English parliaments? Previous to this book, only a few secondary scatterings. The English Parliaments of Henry VII 1485–1504, therefore, pulls this topic together, gives synthesis to such scattered references, and then thoroughly researches and documents extant bits and pieces from contemporary primary evidence.

Review Date: 
1 Oct 2010

Underpinning a good deal of the scholarship on the history of crime in early modern England is the careful and systematic analysis of the records of the busy criminal courts. The most heavily exploited of these records have been the Assize courts and their metropolitan equivalent, the Old Bailey, for examining the experiences and patterns of crime and the administration of the law.

Review Date: 
1 Oct 2010

Wounds, Flesh, and Metaphor in Seventeenth-Century England is a wide-ranging study that examines the metaphor of woundedness within and across political, legal, religious and literary texts.

Review Date: 
1 Jun 2010

This a remarkable book, based on decades of close study of medieval conveyancing documents. The abbreviations list more than 150 cartularies or other charter collections that are cited. Technical as many of the concerns are, the subject provides an ideal bridge between legal and other aspects of history.

Review Date: 
31 May 2010

Helen Lacey’s excellent book appears at a time when the exercise of executive and judicial clemency has become a topical talking point.

Review Date: 
1 May 2010

The Proceedings of the Old Bailey have only been available to historians online since 2003 but, speaking as someone who probably visits the site two or three times a week, I am bound to wonder at how we all managed before then.

Review Date: 
31 Mar 2010

25 years ago, in a provocative reconsideration of English political and social history, English Society 1688–1832, J. C. D.

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