%PDF-1.3 1 0 obj << /Type /Catalog /Outlines 2 0 R /Pages 3 0 R >> endobj 2 0 obj << /Type /Outlines /Count 0 >> endobj 3 0 obj << /Type /Pages /Kids [6 0 R 20 0 R 22 0 R 24 0 R 26 0 R ] /Count 5 /Resources << /ProcSet 4 0 R /Font << /F1 8 0 R /F2 9 0 R /F3 10 0 R >> /XObject << /I1 11 0 R >> >> /MediaBox [0.000 0.000 595.280 841.890] >> endobj 4 0 obj [/PDF /Text /ImageC ] endobj 5 0 obj << /Creator (DOMPDF) /CreationDate (D:20141222031749+00'00') /ModDate (D:20141222031749+00'00') /Title (Identities and Social Change in Britain since 1940: The Politics of Method) >> endobj 6 0 obj << /Type /Page /Parent 3 0 R /Annots [ 12 0 R 15 0 R 18 0 R ] /Contents 7 0 R >> endobj 7 0 obj << /Length 4576 >> stream q 381.750 0 0 120.000 34.016 687.874 cm /I1 Do Q 0.000 0.000 0.000 rg BT 34.016 676.469 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Published on )] TJ ET BT 99.356 676.469 Td /F2 12.0 Tf [(Reviews in History)] TJ ET BT 190.016 676.469 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [( \()] TJ ET 0.000 0.000 0.800 rg BT 197.012 676.469 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(http://www.history.ac.uk/reviews)] TJ ET 0.000 0.000 0.800 RG 0.24 w 0 J [ ] 0 d 197.012 675.075 m 357.332 675.075 l S 0.000 0.000 0.000 rg BT 357.332 676.469 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(\))] TJ ET 0.502 0.502 0.502 RG 0.75 w 0 J [ ] 0 d 34.391 653.743 526.499 1.500 re S BT 34.016 615.321 Td /F3 18.0 Tf [(Identities and Social Change in Britain since 1940: The Politics of )] TJ ET BT 34.016 593.937 Td /F3 18.0 Tf [(Method)] TJ ET BT 34.016 266.195 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(A recent edition of )] TJ ET BT 127.328 266.195 Td /F2 12.0 Tf [(Society Now)] TJ ET BT 186.992 266.195 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(, the magazine of the Economic and Social Research Council, makes a )] TJ ET BT 34.016 251.939 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(compelling case for the substantial contribution of the social sciences towards ?a healthy society, a )] TJ ET BT 34.016 237.683 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(productive economy and a sustainable world?.)] TJ ET 0.000 0.000 0.800 rg BT 256.640 237.683 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(\(1\))] TJ ET 0.000 0.000 0.800 RG 0.24 w 0 J [ ] 0 d 256.640 236.289 m 270.632 236.289 l S 0.000 0.000 0.000 rg BT 270.632 237.683 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [( Professor Mike Savage?s latest work plots the changing )] TJ ET BT 34.016 223.427 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(path of the social sciences through Britain?s post-war social history. His argument is that one of the most )] TJ ET BT 34.016 209.171 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(interesting, yet ignored, changes of the second half of the 20th century is the creeping rise of the social )] TJ ET BT 34.016 194.915 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(science apparatus. The social researcher?s footprint can be seen in the people?s sense of identity and )] TJ ET BT 34.016 180.659 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(belonging and their attitudes towards place, locality, expertise, education, learning, science and art. Many )] TJ ET BT 34.016 166.403 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(modern notions of identity have their origins in the specific events of the 1950s and 1960s. As a )] TJ ET BT 34.016 152.147 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(consequence the structure and method of the social sciences have been transformed in light of their )] TJ ET BT 34.016 137.891 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(importance in the construction, explanation and experience of social identities in Britain. The result is a )] TJ ET BT 34.016 123.635 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(thought-provoking account of the battle between two types of ?doing? the social sciences, cultural )] TJ ET BT 34.016 109.379 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(hierarchies of expertise and the study of power and influence of knowledge in British history.)] TJ ET BT 34.016 83.123 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Conventionally, the rise of the social sciences has been linked with the rise of the welfare state through )] TJ ET BT 34.016 68.867 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(social work and education, for example in the work of A. H. Halsey.)] TJ ET 0.000 0.000 0.800 rg BT 362.612 68.867 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(\(2\))] TJ ET 0.24 w 0 J [ ] 0 d 362.612 67.473 m 376.604 67.473 l S 0.000 0.000 0.000 rg BT 376.604 68.867 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [( However, with David Edgerton )] TJ ET BT 34.016 54.611 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(recently drawing attention to Britain?s role as a ?warfare? not a ?welfare? state, the time seems right for a )] TJ ET BT 34.016 563.315 Td /F3 12.0 Tf [(Review Number:)] TJ ET BT 34.016 549.059 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(1086)] TJ ET BT 34.016 534.803 Td /F3 12.0 Tf [(Publish date:)] TJ ET BT 34.016 520.547 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Wednesday, 1 June, 2011)] TJ ET BT 34.016 506.291 Td /F3 12.0 Tf [(Author:)] TJ ET BT 34.016 492.035 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Mike Savage)] TJ ET BT 34.016 477.779 Td /F3 12.0 Tf [(ISBN:)] TJ ET BT 34.016 463.523 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(9780199587650)] TJ ET BT 34.016 449.267 Td /F3 12.0 Tf [(Date of Publication:)] TJ ET BT 34.016 435.011 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(2011)] TJ ET BT 34.016 420.755 Td /F3 12.0 Tf [(Price:)] TJ ET BT 34.016 406.499 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(58.00)] TJ ET BT 34.016 392.243 Td /F3 12.0 Tf [(Pages:)] TJ ET BT 34.016 377.987 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(300pp.)] TJ ET BT 34.016 363.731 Td /F3 12.0 Tf [(Publisher:)] TJ ET BT 34.016 349.475 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Oxford University Press)] TJ ET BT 34.016 335.219 Td /F3 12.0 Tf [(Place of Publication:)] TJ ET BT 34.016 320.963 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Oxford)] TJ ET BT 34.016 306.707 Td /F3 12.0 Tf [(Reviewer:)] TJ ET BT 34.016 292.451 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Oliver Blaiklock)] TJ ET endstream endobj 8 0 obj << /Type /Font /Subtype /Type1 /Name /F1 /BaseFont /Times-Roman /Encoding /WinAnsiEncoding >> endobj 9 0 obj << /Type /Font /Subtype /Type1 /Name /F2 /BaseFont /Times-Italic /Encoding /WinAnsiEncoding >> endobj 10 0 obj << /Type /Font /Subtype /Type1 /Name /F3 /BaseFont /Times-Bold /Encoding /WinAnsiEncoding >> endobj 11 0 obj << /Type /XObject /Subtype /Image /Width 509 /Height 160 /Filter /FlateDecode /DecodeParms << /Predictor 15 /Colors 3 /Columns 509 /BitsPerComponent 8>> /Mask [ 255 255 255 255 255 255 ] /ColorSpace /DeviceRGB /BitsPerComponent 8 /Length 3280>> stream x[EQ㎦fVttҒ +3O{?lGDQԯDrB^.ϯ%~'0۠/2>0AG_>0j0GCfE67>rB^}@  !&y+r?INp:erc b8f=rQC!~-Wf^^zF[)G 2ޯe7V_Go3Ke GEGOo8rώ#\1ZY~N6^H}yLxS-!:412V+u\-LSO?xVvZ|GjǮT_8EYJF=Tw^ 7GxfN/S:Ʌ~ʟtt?5n÷J'JcF-GVξx{rO~tJd;#a\7}|~y'>}c2C vR}f׈**h.)_&@pfzjsx:5;S\vKhM5j=!Cn+h"u]a EUN]jn=k<,:Ք>sU!ni~6EJ)¦72?G}[y}_vc$t?iSܟ2Zݞ,VN?_`='RFK1A2qv&X_lLRWY'%:I㢖zb_UEx\>&ɆBˏ~K@ \gYØU4}$8Dv!'Q'*+Εj(UCGo[#< 2Ja(sZi9fZKE Rn`u\9r^Zmɯ׹}mstO4uc~#'jEvۼ Dx[z ޏQ4KL5,5u3>i^uÒ-53ba ~,~/pyt1fMU'CVm:qv~=Y'Es"WsφG?l_kN5}],Ow7 uh`xƫ?zMl7ٻv$A(4Dl(wwH} ?=[=S;yC]^BK>㕪9`Z'Wj;E|:bf>kCԘ#RY,iv쵗~}n'"1u" *uO΄/2^Sxr(!/DD\~mJyZ!MmrA!#u[if|99WB WΡpp}w}sh#,\ &:%˳X?D3 %W0cC?o̲^} F3XLVn]Cߖiϧ!7}yZJ#P7]=)7Ρp;>> Ye^xx{Oafw{ ;>4gfLt ʊ:q%#r/)pv!O4wGh|dS ӣݽހ-gVUC'pBxrB^} 7JA^} /'8!`:r?}}],X  }6y!`/~Br?}Q< >k7vx"] ,' .3jn{-i}|~%-};b6#U)7繎kiEw 㤳:E}[޼c"rꬊ7Dc$~"/Y&zSd:tFȌCrʙ`7u .#[-<)j ?TGS(j~oTup(hjU4PlJ=}|it.ҽ@\wʨuXÞZcx18Wo<~ikOg,ވ\^?EneyZcc0[R١z|zv7_m:_n]a?osS3~j^ hD.a_X'KfBX6w wݶ"Oa:,bvhrWH[uCF-Xfc}>x+Rz)2N-B 7y^٨;[/vg? | |2Sve}=o䑰j[vWjF0{굦?VI~}xM(_TlG__+]:#к?S} c>GŸD7 !w{S{B =x7a?oE#)+Gz:o_4Q<;n?\tt7?mGCџQGu4kņOF>F?#} hP&ђߴM#u!.СtL2^#o nIk_i.~7tr@n 1P~3?.[]=S5b߮~Yo^HFH YBi8a4iom>CKgMy*;?zqEӕ` >zB9iFzC?XF?ޟIܰ펉A}{I5ᄊx%ez#Mp@rߎpi]IOVjzuJt\۰f׺u5><,J~PTJp1)}){9N {!`/> endstream endobj 12 0 obj << /Type /Annot /Subtype /Link /A 13 0 R /Border [0 0 0] /H /I /Rect [ 197.0117 675.3895 357.3317 687.2695 ] >> endobj 13 0 obj << /Type /Action /S /URI /URI (http://www.history.ac.uk/reviews) >> endobj 14 0 obj [6 0 R /Fit] endobj 15 0 obj << /Type /Annot /Subtype /Link /A 16 0 R /Border [0 0 0] /H /I /Rect [ 256.6397 236.6035 270.6317 248.4835 ] >> endobj 16 0 obj << /Type /Action >> endobj 17 0 obj [6 0 R /Fit] endobj 18 0 obj << /Type /Annot /Subtype /Link /A 19 0 R /Border [0 0 0] /H /I /Rect [ 362.6117 67.7875 376.6037 79.6675 ] >> endobj 19 0 obj << /Type /Action >> endobj 20 0 obj << /Type /Page /Parent 3 0 R /Contents 21 0 R >> endobj 21 0 obj << /Length 7522 >> stream 0.000 0.000 0.000 rg 0.000 0.000 0.800 RG 0.24 w 0 J [ ] 0 d BT 34.016 796.469 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(reassessment of the role of the social sciences and their relation with the emerging technocratic and scientific )] TJ ET BT 34.016 782.213 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(identities of the expanding and diversifying middle classes. In focusing on the battle for the social sciences )] TJ ET BT 34.016 767.957 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(within the cultural hierarchy of Britain, Savage would seem to be entering new and exciting territory. )] TJ ET BT 34.016 753.701 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Originally trained as a historian, he is now the director of the Centre for Research on Socio-Cultural Change )] TJ ET BT 34.016 739.445 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(and Professor of Sociology at University of Manchester. His early work, on the history of the local Labour )] TJ ET BT 34.016 725.189 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(movement in Preston between 1880 and 1940, explored gender and working class identities, and subsequent )] TJ ET BT 34.016 710.933 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(writings have examined the dynamics of middle class formation in Britain, social capital, mobility and the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 696.677 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(importance of professionalism as a status category in modern British society.)] TJ ET BT 34.016 670.421 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(The idea for his research came about following a decision to examine the material collected in several social )] TJ ET BT 34.016 656.165 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(surveys and research projects. These included Elizabeth Bott's works on family and social networks in the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 641.909 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(early 1950s; Goldthorpe and Lockwood's Affluent Worker Project; and Mass-Observation Directives. The )] TJ ET BT 34.016 627.653 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(result is a fascinating account of change in post-war Britain told in an engaging style and with the benefits of )] TJ ET BT 34.016 613.397 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(expert historical and sociological understanding. For his sources, Savage has exhaustively explored the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 599.141 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(archive materials collected in the course of seven social science projects conducted between the 1940s and )] TJ ET BT 34.016 584.885 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(1970s. Savage successfully tracks the emergence of a language of social groups and relationships, and a )] TJ ET BT 34.016 570.629 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(concern with delineating change and modernity in the archived social science sources.)] TJ ET BT 34.016 544.373 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Savage makes a theoretical nod to the work of Foucault, anthropologists such as Nicholas Dirks, and actor )] TJ ET BT 34.016 530.117 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(network theoreticians such as Bruno Latour. He also references Nikolas Rose?s work on governmentality. )] TJ ET BT 34.016 515.861 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Another theoretical source is the work of Pierre Bourdieu though Savage challenges him on several )] TJ ET BT 34.016 501.605 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(important points, such as the irreconcilability of intellectuals and technical and practical identities. Savage )] TJ ET BT 34.016 487.349 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(also moves beyond the work of Foucault and Rose in terms of his assessment of the politics of knowledge in )] TJ ET BT 34.016 473.093 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Britain, as expressed through the social sciences. His conclusion is that these politics were ?messy? with )] TJ ET BT 34.016 458.837 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(different methods competing for prominence. He shows more agreement with the work of the political )] TJ ET BT 34.016 444.581 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(scientist Timothy Mitchell, who argues that the very act of constructing quantitative data is a central feature )] TJ ET BT 34.016 430.325 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(of modernizing, processes which are fundamental to governing. Indeed, the theoretical emphasis on the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 416.069 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(materiality and agency of technical devices is woven throughout the argument. Savage argues that this )] TJ ET BT 34.016 401.813 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(approach offers a powerful alternative to conventional histories of the social sciences in terms of their )] TJ ET BT 34.016 387.557 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(disciplinary arrangements, theoretical currents or substantive findings.)] TJ ET BT 34.016 361.301 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(The book is divided into three parts. In the first, Savage describes the rise of the social sciences in Britain, )] TJ ET BT 34.016 347.045 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(second; the development of the social science apparatus and third; the impact on popular identities and social )] TJ ET BT 34.016 332.789 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(change. The first section starts with a chapter focussing on a particular research question ? people?s )] TJ ET BT 34.016 318.533 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(attachment to their place of residence as demonstrated through the responses that are generated by different )] TJ ET BT 34.016 304.277 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(kinds of social enquiries since the 1930s. Savage?s point is that people?s feeling of belonging has changed )] TJ ET BT 34.016 290.021 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(over the past 50 years. In particular, the use of the abstract language of groups can be seen in the responses )] TJ ET BT 34.016 275.765 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(of middle class families or individuals and suggests an agency or choice about where people settled that was )] TJ ET BT 34.016 261.509 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(missing from working class accounts, whose responses, in contrast, were mostly expressed in functionalist )] TJ ET BT 34.016 247.253 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(terms or as thrown into their landscape. The relationship between the physical landscape and social is both )] TJ ET BT 34.016 232.997 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(dependent upon and also helps to generate a new kind of academic social science. An aesthetic orientation to )] TJ ET BT 34.016 218.741 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(place, or the ?enchanted landscape? was deliberately used to abstract people from their landscape. )] TJ ET BT 34.016 204.485 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Landscape, Savage suggests, which had been seen as functional and constraining, has increasingly been seen )] TJ ET BT 34.016 190.229 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(as an object of fantasy and desire, hope and escape \(p. 46\).)] TJ ET BT 34.016 163.973 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(The next two chapters see Savage provide a historical grounding to the emergence of the post-war social )] TJ ET BT 34.016 149.717 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(sciences. First, he argues contrary to the work of Bourdieu, that intellectuals needn?t necessarily be in the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 135.461 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(humanities, and that the 1950s saw the rise of a new kind of intellectual based on technocratic expertise. )] TJ ET BT 34.016 121.205 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(This account interrupts previous histories of the ?brow? wars of post-war Britain with the author choosing to )] TJ ET BT 34.016 106.949 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(focus on new scientific intellectuals rather than the artistic modernist avant-garde, who were previously the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 92.693 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(focus of post-war cultural histories of Britain. The Mass-Observation organisation, he argues, was a social )] TJ ET BT 34.016 78.437 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(movement that embodied this new ?nascent technical identity?, and which involved the lifting of expertise )] TJ ET BT 34.016 64.181 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(away from the physical landscape in which gentlemanly status had previously resided. The result was a new )] TJ ET BT 34.016 49.925 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(kind of intellectual formation attracted to the scientific ethos that challenged conventional hierarchies and )] TJ ET endstream endobj 22 0 obj << /Type /Page /Parent 3 0 R /Contents 23 0 R >> endobj 23 0 obj << /Length 7463 >> stream 0.000 0.000 0.000 rg 0.000 0.000 0.800 RG 0.24 w 0 J [ ] 0 d BT 34.016 796.469 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(the importance of brow distinctions.)] TJ ET BT 34.016 770.213 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Second he argues that the attachment to a scientific ethos melded into a social scientific one by the 1960s. )] TJ ET BT 34.016 755.957 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(The changing relationship between the working and middle classes during and following the Second World )] TJ ET BT 34.016 741.701 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(War encouraged the middle classes to reject the gentlemanly embrace of the aristocracy and instead show an )] TJ ET BT 34.016 727.445 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(interest in rational planning, a move more receptive to the social sciences. Such a premise encourages )] TJ ET BT 34.016 713.189 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(historians to understand cultural change of the 1950s and 1960s less in literary terms, and more in terms of )] TJ ET BT 34.016 698.933 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(social scientific values of change abstracted from traditional landscapes and communities. The sense of )] TJ ET BT 34.016 684.677 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(middle class loss of status and style served to reinforce the push towards new technical cultural identities )] TJ ET BT 34.016 670.421 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(that focused on making quality explicit for the working class and for the whole of society. This cultural push )] TJ ET BT 34.016 656.165 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(was wedded to the perception of the middle classes of themselves as providing the buffers or backbone for )] TJ ET BT 34.016 641.909 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(the nation. At the heart of the new social sciences was the desire to make things transparent, to refuse myth )] TJ ET BT 34.016 627.653 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(and to better understand ordinary lives. Their politics was complex and veered between right and left wing )] TJ ET BT 34.016 613.397 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(outlooks. This identity was not simply the product of social change, Savage argues, but the result of disputes )] TJ ET BT 34.016 599.141 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(with other older cultural formations. In short, the emergence of new technical identities and capacities )] TJ ET BT 34.016 584.885 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(associated with the new scientific occupations and the deployment of technical skills disrupted the cultural )] TJ ET BT 34.016 570.629 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(settlement based on gentlemanly highbrow cultural pursuits conducted by the middle and upper classes, )] TJ ET BT 34.016 556.373 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(supported by a hidden world of service.)] TJ ET BT 34.016 530.117 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Chapter four introduces the idea of the 'gentlemanly social sciences' which, Savage argues, dominated the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 515.861 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(academic discipline up to the 1950s. From the post-war period until the early 1950s, it was gentlemanly )] TJ ET BT 34.016 501.605 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(social science which was expanding, a process which can be demonstrated through an examination of the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 487.349 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(formation of the British Sociological Association and with it, the idea of sociology as synthetic, non-)] TJ ET BT 34.016 473.093 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(empirical social science. In order for the new technical identity to triumph, the older gentlemanly one had to )] TJ ET BT 34.016 458.837 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(be defeated. The older style was typified by the London School of Economics, T. H. Marshall's work on the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 444.581 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(evolution of citizenship, and the synthetic theories of Talcott Parsons. The older style had its own models of )] TJ ET BT 34.016 430.325 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(social research based on visual observation and moral responses to the subjects of their research. One )] TJ ET BT 34.016 416.069 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(example of this kind of research tradition is encapsulated in the anthropologist Geoffrey Gorer's 1955 work, )] TJ ET BT 34.016 401.813 Td /F2 12.0 Tf [(Exploring English Character)] TJ ET BT 174.020 401.813 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(. In the book, Gorer commented: 'When I was reading, with extreme care, the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 387.557 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(first batch of questionnaires which I received, I found I was constantly making the same notes: "What dull )] TJ ET BT 34.016 373.301 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(lives most of these people appear to lead!" I remarked; and secondly, "What good people!"? \(p. 5\). Such )] TJ ET BT 34.016 359.045 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(views, Savage argues took the values of contemporary civilization for granted, and saw its role as seeking )] TJ ET BT 34.016 344.789 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(the means of extending citizenship and civilization to wider groups in the population.)] TJ ET BT 34.016 318.533 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(The launch of New Society in 1962 is highlighted as a prime source driving the new specialist sociology, )] TJ ET BT 34.016 304.277 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [('neutral, specialist, objective', implied by new technical identities within the academic social sciences during )] TJ ET BT 34.016 290.021 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(the 1960s. Sociology is portrayed here as a social movement, challenging traditional ways of knowing )] TJ ET BT 34.016 275.765 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(through an appeal to a new rational mode of expertise that appealed to science. Again the new sociology had )] TJ ET BT 34.016 261.509 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(to actively compete with, and effectively overcome, the old sociology emanating from the LSE, a social )] TJ ET BT 34.016 247.253 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(science of elite administrative links with Whitehall and central to government. The new plate glass )] TJ ET BT 34.016 232.997 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(universities built during the 1960s served, in this reading, to spread the new values of the specialist )] TJ ET BT 34.016 218.741 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(sociology which in turn undermined or questioned the intellectual underpinnings of other disciplines. )] TJ ET BT 34.016 204.485 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Through the 1960s, sociology and its intellectuals emerged to inherit the non partisan role of custodians of )] TJ ET BT 34.016 190.229 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(the ?social? from its previous keepers ? historians and literary critics. This transformation of the disciplinary )] TJ ET BT 34.016 175.973 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(base of the academic infrastructure reinforced this sociological moment.)] TJ ET BT 34.016 149.717 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(The agency of the new social sciences can be seen, Savage argues, in its quest to define the average or )] TJ ET BT 34.016 135.461 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(typical English town as the site of social change. Anthropologists, political scientists, geographers all sought )] TJ ET BT 34.016 121.205 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(to wrest descriptions of the community away from literary idioms of the inter-war years focusing on )] TJ ET BT 34.016 106.949 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(tradition. Anthropology originally led the way, and the two disciplines at first combined in their quest. )] TJ ET BT 34.016 92.693 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(However, it was sociology, Savage argues, that won the right to define the community, as the site of new )] TJ ET BT 34.016 78.437 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(and emerging social change, beginning with Stacey?s research on Banbury. Descriptions of communities )] TJ ET BT 34.016 64.181 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(gave way to descriptions of communities as sites of change. However, the search for change, Savage )] TJ ET BT 34.016 49.925 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(suggests, ended in failure, and as a consequence social science began to abstract class from local social )] TJ ET endstream endobj 24 0 obj << /Type /Page /Parent 3 0 R /Contents 25 0 R >> endobj 25 0 obj << /Length 7330 >> stream 0.000 0.000 0.000 rg 0.000 0.000 0.800 RG 0.24 w 0 J [ ] 0 d BT 34.016 796.469 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(relations. Change became less and less embedded in the landscape and became abstract.)] TJ ET BT 34.016 770.213 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(The next two chapters focus on the key social science methods: the interview, and the sample survey. Savage )] TJ ET BT 34.016 755.957 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(argues that the first of these two methods had to be wrenched from the hands of applied professionals, such )] TJ ET BT 34.016 741.701 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(as social workers and priests, in order for the social sciences to use it as a mechanism for the study of )] TJ ET BT 34.016 727.445 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(individuals abstracted from their household surroundings. What is more, the interview, it is argued, was )] TJ ET BT 34.016 713.189 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(removed from its distinctly therapeutic domain in which it was originally deployed and, in collaboration )] TJ ET BT 34.016 698.933 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(with literary narratives, was used by social scientists in order to provide, 'melodramas of social mobility'. )] TJ ET BT 34.016 684.677 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(The rational, objective interview, free of moral values and assumptions challenged the previous role of )] TJ ET BT 34.016 670.421 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(women as interviewers, a point which Savage supports by referencing academic feminism's attack on the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 656.165 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(masculine social scientific approach in the later 1960s. The assertion of a feminist kind of social research )] TJ ET BT 34.016 641.909 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(was a counter-mobilization against this current.)] TJ ET BT 34.016 615.653 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Second, governments, Savage suggests, made extensive use of the sample survey for gathering social data, )] TJ ET BT 34.016 601.397 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(and this was a crucial technology for defining the modern rational nation. The experience of the Second )] TJ ET BT 34.016 587.141 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(World War was crucial here, and the concerns of governments with productivity, mobilization, production )] TJ ET BT 34.016 572.885 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(and destruction. The sample survey became the means of generating knowledge about popular feeling in turn )] TJ ET BT 34.016 558.629 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(bypassing accounts of the elected representatives of the people. The truth of the nation was guaranteed )] TJ ET BT 34.016 544.373 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(through science as the capacity to conduct large national social surveys became an important feature of the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 530.117 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(post-war state \(for example, the Family Expenditure Survey, began in 1957, the General Household Survey )] TJ ET BT 34.016 515.861 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(from 1962, and the New Earnings Survey from 1971\). This process was itself complicated by four )] TJ ET BT 34.016 501.605 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(competing strands of argument as to the value of the social survey method: its significance in the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 487.349 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(development of individuals; its importance in the new interest shown to social groups; its encapsulation of )] TJ ET BT 34.016 473.093 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(the nation; and its use in embedding notions of change, through the manipulation of data. Savage references )] TJ ET BT 34.016 458.837 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(the importance of the Royal Statistical Society and the development of the Government Statistical Service as )] TJ ET BT 34.016 444.581 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(vehicles for social research.)] TJ ET BT 34.016 418.325 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(In the third and final section Savage considers social change and its impact on popular identities. The )] TJ ET BT 34.016 404.069 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(argument put forward is that the 1950s and 60s saw the erosion of the cultural standoff that had previously )] TJ ET BT 34.016 389.813 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(existed between middle- and working-class identities. This process relied on the decoupling of technique )] TJ ET BT 34.016 375.557 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(from skilled workers and its appropriation by the middle classes. This argument relies first of all on an )] TJ ET BT 34.016 361.301 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(examination of the field work of Richard Brown in Tyneside and John Goldthorpe and David Lockwood on )] TJ ET BT 34.016 347.045 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(working class identities. Savage argues that the previous conclusions drawn from this research, about the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 332.789 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(growth of a new affluent, privatised instrumental worker, are overstated. Instead, Savage suggests that )] TJ ET BT 34.016 318.533 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(working-class identities in this period remained premised on the existence of a visible, public elite drawn )] TJ ET BT 34.016 304.277 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(from the aristocracy. An understanding, Savage suggests, that attempted to naturalise class by showing the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 290.021 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(tradition and history of such elites. This conception of class was not, however, without its tensions and the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 275.765 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(assumed extraordinariness of elites were inevitably contrasted in working-class identities with the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 261.509 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(ordinariness of working individuals, thus in turn challenging their own sense of individuality. By contrast, )] TJ ET BT 34.016 247.253 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(the growing technical and managerial professions were absent from working-class accounts of class. )] TJ ET BT 34.016 232.997 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Consequently, with the importance of the acquisition of formal educational credentials now in the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 218.741 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(ascendancy, coupled with the decline of apprenticeships, the male manual working class lost their cultural )] TJ ET BT 34.016 204.485 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(distinctiveness.)] TJ ET BT 34.016 178.229 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Among the middle classes, Savage suggests, there was a shift from understanding class as something born )] TJ ET BT 34.016 163.973 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(into, to understanding it as something that was navigated by strategically mobile individuals. Technocratic )] TJ ET BT 34.016 149.717 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(identities became more credentialist in orientation and shifted away from being implicit and taken for )] TJ ET BT 34.016 135.461 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(granted. Social studies of the 1960s began to reveal some new idioms of new middle-class identity. Taking )] TJ ET BT 34.016 121.205 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Goldthorpe and Lockwood's interviews with 150 lower middle-class respondents Savage uses them as an )] TJ ET BT 34.016 106.949 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(evidence of a recognition of the notion of professional education leading to the possibility of social mobility. )] TJ ET BT 34.016 92.693 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Education and intelligence were now independent forces for good. By the 1960s, Savage argues, significant )] TJ ET BT 34.016 78.437 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(sections of the middle classes were more confident and assertive in deployment of technocratic language, )] TJ ET BT 34.016 64.181 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(expertise, planning and class. The broader point that Savage is arguing is that those social theorists who have )] TJ ET BT 34.016 49.925 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(defined individualization as marking a break from class are misconceiving the key processes at stake. )] TJ ET endstream endobj 26 0 obj << /Type /Page /Parent 3 0 R /Annots [ 28 0 R 30 0 R 32 0 R 34 0 R ] /Contents 27 0 R >> endobj 27 0 obj << /Length 4996 >> stream 0.000 0.000 0.000 rg 0.000 0.000 0.800 RG 0.24 w 0 J [ ] 0 d BT 34.016 796.469 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Instead, he argues for a deepening of old identities through the same process by which they are reworked.)] TJ ET BT 34.016 770.213 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(The ramifications for the contemporary social sciences of the battle over expertise are spelt out in Savage's )] TJ ET BT 34.016 755.957 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(concluding chapter. First for contemporary popular narratives. The creation of an 'intimate, critical, and )] TJ ET BT 34.016 741.701 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(compassionate' sociology Savage remarks, revolved around the methods of the new social sciences in a )] TJ ET BT 34.016 727.445 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(reworking of who was able to speak about the present. A crucial feature was the mobilisation of the ordinary )] TJ ET BT 34.016 713.189 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(and the everyday. Savage uses the example of accounts written by mass observers in 1990, to demonstrate )] TJ ET BT 34.016 698.933 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(just how pervasive the language of sociology has become in people's understandings and descriptions of self. )] TJ ET BT 34.016 684.677 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(He demonstrates just how far sociological accounts have come to dominate the public repertoire of routine )] TJ ET BT 34.016 670.421 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(and everydayness. This is due, Savage concludes, to a shift in cultural hierarchies rather than scientific )] TJ ET BT 34.016 656.165 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(progress. Second, he considers the challenge of informationalism. The emergence of digital data actually )] TJ ET BT 34.016 641.909 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(marks a return to older forms of social research, concerned with mapping whole populations using )] TJ ET BT 34.016 627.653 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(administrative data or sampling techniques. The role and influence of the social sciences may be damaged, )] TJ ET BT 34.016 613.397 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Savage hypothesises for the future, and there may be a return to their role as synthesisers and generalizers.)] TJ ET BT 34.016 587.141 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Mike Savage is one of the UK's foremost historical sociologists and his recent exciting book provides a )] TJ ET BT 34.016 572.885 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(fascinating insight into the history of the social sciences and their role in the remaking of social class )] TJ ET BT 34.016 558.629 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(identities in Britain from the 1930s to the present day. Some historians may take issue with the work?s )] TJ ET BT 34.016 544.373 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(theoretical stance, but notwithstanding such objections, this book provides a fascinating consideration of the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 530.117 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(role of expertise within British 20th-century history and its interaction within the creation of a specialised )] TJ ET BT 34.016 515.861 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(sociology as an academic subject. It raises questions of who is able to speak about the present, and with what )] TJ ET BT 34.016 501.605 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(authority, and expertly charts the process by which social scientists, under the guise of 'technique', stole the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 487.349 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(clothes of the artistic and historical establishment and usurped their previous role as the interpreters of social )] TJ ET BT 34.016 473.093 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(change. Consequently it will be of great use to historians and sociologists of post-war Britain.)] TJ ET BT 34.016 438.195 Td /F3 18.0 Tf [(Notes)] TJ ET BT 48.816 407.578 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(1.)] TJ ET BT 64.016 407.573 Td /F2 12.0 Tf [(Society Now)] TJ ET BT 123.680 407.573 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(, 6, \(Spring 2010\), 4.)] TJ ET 0.000 0.000 0.800 rg BT 223.676 407.573 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Back to \(1\))] TJ ET 0.24 w 0 J [ ] 0 d 223.676 406.179 m 277.664 406.179 l S 0.000 0.000 0.000 rg BT 48.816 393.322 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(2.)] TJ ET BT 64.016 393.317 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(A. H. Halsey, )] TJ ET BT 132.668 393.317 Td /F2 12.0 Tf [(A History of Sociology in Britain Science, Literature, and Society)] TJ ET BT 446.984 393.317 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [( \(Oxford, 2004\).)] TJ ET 0.000 0.000 0.800 rg BT 525.632 393.317 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Back )] TJ ET 0.24 w 0 J [ ] 0 d 525.632 391.923 m 553.292 391.923 l S BT 64.016 379.061 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(to \(2\))] TJ ET 0.24 w 0 J [ ] 0 d 64.016 377.667 m 90.344 377.667 l S 0.000 0.000 0.000 rg BT 34.016 352.805 Td /F3 12.0 Tf [(Other reviews:)] TJ ET BT 34.016 338.549 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [([2])] TJ ET 0.502 0.502 0.502 RG 0.75 w 0 J [ ] 0 d 34.391 333.823 526.499 1.500 re S BT 34.016 316.043 Td /F3 12.0 Tf [(Source URL:)] TJ ET 0.000 0.000 0.800 rg BT 104.672 316.043 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(http://www.history.ac.uk/reviews/review/1086)] TJ ET 0.000 0.000 0.800 RG 0.24 w 0 J [ ] 0 d 104.672 314.649 m 328.316 314.649 l S 0.000 0.000 0.000 rg BT 34.016 289.672 Td /F3 12.0 Tf [(Links:)] TJ ET BT 34.016 275.272 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [([1] http://www.history.ac.uk/reviews/item/5502)] TJ ET BT 34.016 260.872 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [([2] http://www.history.ac.uk/reviews)] TJ ET endstream endobj 28 0 obj << /Type /Annot /Subtype /Link /A 29 0 R /Border [0 0 0] /H /I /Rect [ 223.6757 406.4935 277.6637 418.3735 ] >> endobj 29 0 obj << /Type /Action /S /GoTo /D 14 0 R >> endobj 30 0 obj << /Type /Annot /Subtype /Link /A 31 0 R /Border [0 0 0] /H /I /Rect [ 525.6317 392.2375 553.2917 404.1175 ] >> endobj 31 0 obj << /Type /Action /S /GoTo /D 17 0 R >> endobj 32 0 obj << /Type /Annot /Subtype /Link /A 33 0 R /Border [0 0 0] /H /I /Rect [ 64.0157 377.9815 90.3437 389.8615 ] >> endobj 33 0 obj << /Type /Action /S /GoTo /D 17 0 R >> endobj 34 0 obj << /Type /Annot /Subtype /Link /A 35 0 R /Border [0 0 0] /H /I /Rect [ 104.6717 314.9635 328.3157 326.8435 ] >> endobj 35 0 obj << /Type /Action /S /URI /URI (http://www.history.ac.uk/reviews/review/1086) >> endobj xref 0 36 0000000000 65535 f 0000000008 00000 n 0000000073 00000 n 0000000119 00000 n 0000000349 00000 n 0000000386 00000 n 0000000584 00000 n 0000000680 00000 n 0000005308 00000 n 0000005417 00000 n 0000005527 00000 n 0000005636 00000 n 0000009197 00000 n 0000009325 00000 n 0000009409 00000 n 0000009438 00000 n 0000009566 00000 n 0000009602 00000 n 0000009631 00000 n 0000009757 00000 n 0000009793 00000 n 0000009858 00000 n 0000017433 00000 n 0000017498 00000 n 0000025014 00000 n 0000025079 00000 n 0000032462 00000 n 0000032567 00000 n 0000037616 00000 n 0000037744 00000 n 0000037799 00000 n 0000037927 00000 n 0000037982 00000 n 0000038108 00000 n 0000038163 00000 n 0000038291 00000 n trailer << /Size 36 /Root 1 0 R /Info 5 0 R >> startxref 38387 %%EOF