%PDF-1.3 1 0 obj << /Type /Catalog /Outlines 2 0 R /Pages 3 0 R >> endobj 2 0 obj << /Type /Outlines /Count 0 >> endobj 3 0 obj << /Type /Pages /Kids [6 0 R 14 0 R 16 0 R 18 0 R 20 0 R ] /Count 5 /Resources << /ProcSet 4 0 R /Font << /F1 8 0 R /F2 9 0 R /F3 10 0 R >> /XObject << /I1 11 0 R >> >> /MediaBox [0.000 0.000 595.280 841.890] >> endobj 4 0 obj [/PDF /Text /ImageC ] endobj 5 0 obj << /Creator (DOMPDF) /CreationDate (D:20140417165028+01'00') /ModDate (D:20140417165028+01'00') /Title (Pompeii in the Public Imagination, from Rediscovery to Today) >> endobj 6 0 obj << /Type /Page /Parent 3 0 R /Annots [ 12 0 R ] /Contents 7 0 R >> endobj 7 0 obj << /Length 4199 >> stream q 381.750 0 0 120.000 34.016 687.874 cm /I1 Do Q 0.000 0.000 0.000 rg BT 34.016 676.469 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Published on )] TJ ET BT 99.356 676.469 Td /F2 12.0 Tf [(Reviews in History)] TJ ET BT 190.016 676.469 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [( \()] TJ ET 0.000 0.000 0.800 rg BT 197.012 676.469 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(http://www.history.ac.uk/reviews)] TJ ET 0.000 0.000 0.800 RG 0.24 w 0 J [ ] 0 d 197.012 675.075 m 357.332 675.075 l S 0.000 0.000 0.000 rg BT 357.332 676.469 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(\))] TJ ET 0.502 0.502 0.502 RG 0.75 w 0 J [ ] 0 d 34.391 653.743 526.499 1.500 re S BT 34.016 615.321 Td /F3 18.0 Tf [(Pompeii in the Public Imagination, from Rediscovery to Today)] TJ ET BT 34.016 273.323 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(No one would deny that Pompeii, the city destroyed by the forces of nature ? as when, in the words of the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 259.067 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(poet Leopardi, ?an overripe tomato falls on an anthill? ? has attained the status of an archetype, outpacing )] TJ ET BT 34.016 244.811 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(even Atlantis \(whose story must now be explained to the unfamiliar in terms of the fate of Pompeii\). Upon )] TJ ET BT 34.016 230.555 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(their rediscovery in the second quarter of the 18th century, Pompeii and Herculaneum became the objects of )] TJ ET BT 34.016 216.299 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(an important dispute between ?owner?, the king of Naples, and ?users?, classically educated travelers from )] TJ ET BT 34.016 202.043 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(the north. This was an uneven contest which the travelers won easily, though the king and his successors )] TJ ET BT 34.016 187.787 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(attempted and in part succeeded in shaping the narrative in important ways: through acquisition and )] TJ ET BT 34.016 173.531 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(appropriation of property as patrimony, and management of the archaeological sites \(?scavi di Pompei?, )] TJ ET BT 34.016 159.275 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(etc.\). The visitors, for their part, mostly antiquarians and ?virtuosi? to begin with, morphed into poets, )] TJ ET BT 34.016 145.019 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(librettists, novelists, diarists, painters, professional archaeologists, psychologists, and other curiosity seekers, )] TJ ET BT 34.016 130.763 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(and ranged in social status from lowly vagabonds to heads of state. )] TJ ET BT 358.304 130.763 Td /F2 12.0 Tf [(Pompeii in the Public Imagination)] TJ ET BT 524.300 130.763 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(, )] TJ ET BT 34.016 116.507 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(edited by Shelley Hales and Joanna Paul, can serve as a casebook to illustrate many of the important )] TJ ET BT 34.016 102.251 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(intermediaries in the making of this archetype.)] TJ ET BT 34.016 75.995 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(The 25 individually-authored chapters in this collection began mostly as papers delivered at a conference, )] TJ ET BT 34.016 61.739 Td /F2 12.0 Tf [(Ruins and Reconstructions: Pompeii in the Popular Imagination,)] TJ ET BT 346.676 61.739 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [( organized by the editors at the University )] TJ ET BT 34.016 584.699 Td /F3 12.0 Tf [(Review Number:)] TJ ET BT 34.016 570.443 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(1284)] TJ ET BT 34.016 556.187 Td /F3 12.0 Tf [(Publish date:)] TJ ET BT 34.016 541.931 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Thursday, 12 July, 2012)] TJ ET BT 34.016 527.675 Td /F3 12.0 Tf [(Editor:)] TJ ET BT 34.016 513.419 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Shelley Hales)] TJ ET BT 34.016 499.163 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Joanna Paul)] TJ ET BT 34.016 484.907 Td /F3 12.0 Tf [(ISBN:)] TJ ET BT 34.016 470.651 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(9780199569366)] TJ ET BT 34.016 456.395 Td /F3 12.0 Tf [(Date of Publication:)] TJ ET BT 34.016 442.139 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(2011)] TJ ET BT 34.016 427.883 Td /F3 12.0 Tf [(Price:)] TJ ET BT 34.016 413.627 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(80.00)] TJ ET BT 34.016 399.371 Td /F3 12.0 Tf [(Pages:)] TJ ET BT 34.016 385.115 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(440pp.)] TJ ET BT 34.016 370.859 Td /F3 12.0 Tf [(Publisher:)] TJ ET BT 34.016 356.603 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Oxford University Press)] TJ ET BT 34.016 342.347 Td /F3 12.0 Tf [(Place of Publication:)] TJ ET BT 34.016 328.091 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Oxford)] TJ ET BT 34.016 313.835 Td /F3 12.0 Tf [(Reviewer:)] TJ ET BT 34.016 299.579 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Eugene Dwyer)] TJ ET endstream endobj 8 0 obj << /Type /Font /Subtype /Type1 /Name /F1 /BaseFont /Times-Roman /Encoding /WinAnsiEncoding >> endobj 9 0 obj << /Type /Font /Subtype /Type1 /Name /F2 /BaseFont /Times-Italic /Encoding /WinAnsiEncoding >> endobj 10 0 obj << /Type /Font /Subtype /Type1 /Name /F3 /BaseFont /Times-Bold /Encoding /WinAnsiEncoding >> endobj 11 0 obj << /Type /XObject /Subtype /Image /Width 509 /Height 160 /Filter /FlateDecode /DecodeParms << /Predictor 15 /Colors 3 /Columns 509 /BitsPerComponent 8>> /Mask [ 255 255 255 255 255 255 ] /ColorSpace /DeviceRGB /BitsPerComponent 8 /Length 3280>> stream x[EQ㎦fVttҒ +3O{?lGDQԯDrB^.ϯ%~'0۠/2>0AG_>0j0GCfE67>rB^}@  !&y+r?INp:erc b8f=rQC!~-Wf^^zF[)G 2ޯe7V_Go3Ke GEGOo8rώ#\1ZY~N6^H}yLxS-!:412V+u\-LSO?xVvZ|GjǮT_8EYJF=Tw^ 7GxfN/S:Ʌ~ʟtt?5n÷J'JcF-GVξx{rO~tJd;#a\7}|~y'>}c2C vR}f׈**h.)_&@pfzjsx:5;S\vKhM5j=!Cn+h"u]a EUN]jn=k<,:Ք>sU!ni~6EJ)¦72?G}[y}_vc$t?iSܟ2Zݞ,VN?_`='RFK1A2qv&X_lLRWY'%:I㢖zb_UEx\>&ɆBˏ~K@ \gYØU4}$8Dv!'Q'*+Εj(UCGo[#< 2Ja(sZi9fZKE Rn`u\9r^Zmɯ׹}mstO4uc~#'jEvۼ Dx[z ޏQ4KL5,5u3>i^uÒ-53ba ~,~/pyt1fMU'CVm:qv~=Y'Es"WsφG?l_kN5}],Ow7 uh`xƫ?zMl7ٻv$A(4Dl(wwH} ?=[=S;yC]^BK>㕪9`Z'Wj;E|:bf>kCԘ#RY,iv쵗~}n'"1u" *uO΄/2^Sxr(!/DD\~mJyZ!MmrA!#u[if|99WB WΡpp}w}sh#,\ &:%˳X?D3 %W0cC?o̲^} F3XLVn]Cߖiϧ!7}yZJ#P7]=)7Ρp;>> Ye^xx{Oafw{ ;>4gfLt ʊ:q%#r/)pv!O4wGh|dS ӣݽހ-gVUC'pBxrB^} 7JA^} /'8!`:r?}}],X  }6y!`/~Br?}Q< >k7vx"] ,' .3jn{-i}|~%-};b6#U)7繎kiEw 㤳:E}[޼c"rꬊ7Dc$~"/Y&zSd:tFȌCrʙ`7u .#[-<)j ?TGS(j~oTup(hjU4PlJ=}|it.ҽ@\wʨuXÞZcx18Wo<~ikOg,ވ\^?EneyZcc0[R١z|zv7_m:_n]a?osS3~j^ hD.a_X'KfBX6w wݶ"Oa:,bvhrWH[uCF-Xfc}>x+Rz)2N-B 7y^٨;[/vg? | |2Sve}=o䑰j[vWjF0{굦?VI~}xM(_TlG__+]:#к?S} c>GŸD7 !w{S{B =x7a?oE#)+Gz:o_4Q<;n?\tt7?mGCџQGu4kņOF>F?#} hP&ђߴM#u!.СtL2^#o nIk_i.~7tr@n 1P~3?.[]=S5b߮~Yo^HFH YBi8a4iom>CKgMy*;?zqEӕ` >zB9iFzC?XF?ޟIܰ펉A}{I5ᄊx%ez#Mp@rߎpi]IOVjzuJt\۰f׺u5><,J~PTJp1)}){9N {!`/> endstream endobj 12 0 obj << /Type /Annot /Subtype /Link /A 13 0 R /Border [0 0 0] /H /I /Rect [ 197.0117 675.3895 357.3317 687.2695 ] >> endobj 13 0 obj << /Type /Action /S /URI /URI (http://www.history.ac.uk/reviews) >> endobj 14 0 obj << /Type /Page /Parent 3 0 R /Contents 15 0 R >> endobj 15 0 obj << /Length 7384 >> stream 0.000 0.000 0.000 rg 0.502 0.502 0.502 RG 0.75 w 0 J [ ] 0 d BT 34.016 796.469 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(of Bristol in 2007. In their use of the term ?public imagination?, Hales and Paul have sought to express the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 782.213 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(plurality of meanings attached to Pompeii by the public, from the moment of discovery to the present. They )] TJ ET BT 34.016 767.957 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(have attempted to distinguish their approach from those works that have concerned themselves with )] TJ ET BT 34.016 753.701 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(archaeology and art history in a narrower sense. Only recently has a global image of Pompeii begun to )] TJ ET BT 34.016 739.445 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(emerge, struggling against diverse, mainly national images; French, English, German, Spanish, and Italian. )] TJ ET BT 34.016 725.189 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(The chronological distribution of the essays gives the appearance of diversity to this collection, but )] TJ ET BT 34.016 710.933 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(persistent inter-textuality in the respective languages is strikingly apparent. Though the 18th-century )] TJ ET BT 34.016 696.677 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(travelers are best considered as an international group, those who came later are more exclusively )] TJ ET BT 34.016 682.421 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(nationalist: French authors read French literature; English read English; no one reads Italian except the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 668.165 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Italians. \(What do the Japanese read? The Chinese?\) The present effort to trace the course of Pompeii?s )] TJ ET BT 34.016 653.909 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(growing reception is very promising, as it opens the way for future collections. Even such undiversified )] TJ ET BT 34.016 639.653 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(cultures as pre-Civil War America, as examined here by Margaret Malamud, can show themes of universal )] TJ ET BT 34.016 625.397 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(appeal in Pompeii?s reception, namely, the apocalyptic theme that runs through so many of the essays. Is it a )] TJ ET BT 34.016 611.141 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(coincidence that Rome was obsessed with the inevitability of universal cataclysm at the time of Pompeii?s )] TJ ET BT 34.016 596.885 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(destruction? Was the terrible fate of the Vesuvian cities the vengeance of God angered over the destruction )] TJ ET BT 34.016 582.629 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(of Jerusalem by the Romans? Is it beyond credibility that men might believe so for want of a scientific )] TJ ET BT 34.016 568.373 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(understanding of the workings of volcanoes? As the new millennium has hardly brought any relief from )] TJ ET BT 34.016 554.117 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(popular worries about the End Time, there is a virtual guarantee of Pompeii?s survival as archetype of )] TJ ET BT 34.016 539.861 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(cataclysm. This should reassure the present Italian government that Pompeii is worth investing in.)] TJ ET BT 34.016 513.605 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(On the side of the ?owners?, Jeremy Hartnett?s essay on Vittorio Spinazzola, the excavator of the beautiful )] TJ ET BT 34.016 499.349 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(shop-lined street known as the Via dell?Abbondanza, shows the important role played by the director of )] TJ ET BT 34.016 485.093 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(excavations in shaping a generation?s experience of the archaeological site, a theme that is also dealt with by )] TJ ET BT 34.016 470.837 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Andrew Wallace-Hadrill in his epilogue on Herculaneum \(especially Francesco La Vega?s 18th-century )] TJ ET BT 34.016 456.581 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(excavations there and in Pompeii\). Wallace-Hadrill throws some well-aimed barbs in passing at Giuseppe )] TJ ET BT 34.016 442.325 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Fiorelli, the director of the Pompeian excavations 1860?75, who is justly credited in many of the essays for )] TJ ET BT 34.016 428.069 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(his role in creating the modern tourist site of Pompeii and playing guiding spirit. \(He might not have been as )] TJ ET BT 34.016 413.813 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(good as he seems.\) The part played by museums in presenting the objects from Pompeii and derivative )] TJ ET BT 34.016 399.557 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(works occupies five essays. Shelley Hales, one of the editors of the collection, considers the charged issue of )] TJ ET BT 34.016 385.301 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(the display of dead bodies at Pompeii in the context of 19th-century cemeteries. She has taken on a theme )] TJ ET BT 34.016 371.045 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(seldom seen in scholarly literature on Pompeii, but one that must have been of great interest to many in the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 356.789 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(19th century: spiritualism. Mme. Blavatsky?s first encounters with Isis came about via Pompeii. A number )] TJ ET BT 34.016 342.533 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(of essays in this collection treat phantom apparitions in fiction and painting and may be read in connection )] TJ ET BT 34.016 328.277 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(with this one. \(In fact, many of the essays are mutually interdependent, bespeaking a lively parent )] TJ ET BT 34.016 314.021 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(conference.\) Two essays on the pornographic collection of the Naples Museum ? Kate Fisher and Rebecca )] TJ ET BT 34.016 299.765 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Langlands on the ?censorship myth? and Sarah Levin-Richardson on the museological experience of visitors )] TJ ET BT 34.016 285.509 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(to Pompeii?s ?brothel? and the museum?s notorious ?secret cabinet? ? present the issue of displaying )] TJ ET BT 34.016 271.253 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(sexually charged objects from different perspectives. Though both essays consider the works in the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 256.997 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(collection as erotica, noting that definitions of ?erotica? varied over the course of the years, neither essay )] TJ ET BT 34.016 242.741 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(raises the issue of phallica ? as good luck charms and the like ? in the Neapolitan context \(which would be )] TJ ET BT 34.016 228.485 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(relevant to ?the public imagination?\). Jon Seydl?s essay on Pompeiana in old Philadelphia notes the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 214.229 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(popularity of the )] TJ ET BT 117.008 214.229 Td /F2 12.0 Tf [(Pompeian Museum)] TJ ET BT 209.324 214.229 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(, a set of 34 peephole exhibits apparently much loved by the public at )] TJ ET BT 34.016 199.973 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(the turn of the last century \()] TJ ET BT 167.324 199.973 Td /F2 12.0 Tf [(that )] TJ ET BT 188.996 199.973 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(century\) and moved to the basement of the city?s art museum when a more )] TJ ET BT 34.016 185.717 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(elitist taste had become )] TJ ET BT 149.336 185.717 Td /F2 12.0 Tf [(de rigueur)] TJ ET BT 199.664 185.717 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(. Kenneth Lapatin?s essay on Jean Paul Getty uses much newly available )] TJ ET BT 34.016 171.461 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(material to illuminate the life and collecting habits of one of the 20th century?s most enthusiastic and )] TJ ET BT 34.016 157.205 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(influential Pompeianists. Getty?s obsession with Herculaneum \(less with Pompeii\) is evidently due to his )] TJ ET BT 34.016 142.949 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(identification with Julius Caesar, whose father-in-law Calpurnius Piso may have owned a villa there, )] TJ ET BT 34.016 128.693 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(subsequently the model for Getty?s museum-villa in Malibu. This is the stuff that dreams are made of.)] TJ ET endstream endobj 16 0 obj << /Type /Page /Parent 3 0 R /Contents 17 0 R >> endobj 17 0 obj << /Length 8429 >> stream 0.000 0.000 0.000 rg 0.502 0.502 0.502 RG 0.75 w 0 J [ ] 0 d BT 34.016 784.469 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Novelists and painters are clearly revealed in this collection to be the ?antennae of the age?. Among the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 770.213 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(?users?, richly represented here, are to be found the visitors, often artists, writers, and other sensitive souls )] TJ ET BT 34.016 755.957 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(who descended on the site in pursuit of phantoms, but sometimes, like Wilhelm Zahn, Edward Bulwer-)] TJ ET BT 34.016 741.701 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Lytton, or Roberto Rossellini, prepared to lay siege.)] TJ ET BT 34.016 715.445 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Essays on Pompeian opinion makers who belong to the 18th century by birth or by the date of their visit )] TJ ET BT 34.016 701.189 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(form a coherent group illustrating an international set of aristocrats familiar with classical literature and art, )] TJ ET BT 34.016 686.933 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(writing and painting for an audience of their own kind. Constanze Baum?s essay on William Beckford )] TJ ET BT 34.016 672.677 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(reveals the young Englishman writing in the ?Sturm und Drang? style fashionable in Germany and France at )] TJ ET BT 34.016 658.421 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(the time of his visit in 1780. Victoria C. Gardner Coates discusses three of Angelica Kauffmann?s history )] TJ ET BT 34.016 644.165 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(paintings with three antique Neapolitan subjects, including )] TJ ET BT 319.328 644.165 Td /F2 12.0 Tf [(Pliny the Younger and His Mother at Misenum, )] TJ ET BT 34.016 629.909 Td /F2 12.0 Tf [(79 AD)] TJ ET BT 65.012 629.909 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [( \(1785\), the three works constituting ?a sort of scholarly, neoclassical postcard from Kauffmann back )] TJ ET BT 34.016 615.653 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(to the [Royal] Academy ? \(p. 57\). Barbara Witucki, writing on Mme. De Stal?s )] TJ ET BT 422.612 615.653 Td /F2 12.0 Tf [(Corinne, ou Italie)] TJ ET BT 508.280 615.653 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [( \(1807\), )] TJ ET BT 34.016 601.397 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(shows how Pompeii served as a kind of descent to the underworld for the increasingly isolated characters in )] TJ ET BT 34.016 587.141 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Stal?s novel, which resonates so powerfully with Vergil?s )] TJ ET BT 320.972 587.141 Td /F2 12.0 Tf [(Aeneid)] TJ ET BT 354.296 587.141 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(. Reference to contemporary Italian \(viz. )] TJ ET BT 34.016 572.885 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Napoleonic\) politics would have been interesting here. Thorsten Fitzon?s writing on Pompeii?s most famous )] TJ ET BT 34.016 558.629 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(visitor, alerts us to the fact that Pompeii?s reception is inextricably wound up in Goethe?s reception. Did )] TJ ET BT 34.016 544.373 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Goethe visit Pompeii twice, as the standard text of )] TJ ET BT 278.660 544.373 Td /F2 12.0 Tf [(Italian Journey)] TJ ET BT 352.316 544.373 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [( would have it, or just once? Apparently, )] TJ ET BT 34.016 530.117 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(just once. Did Goethe even manage to )] TJ ET BT 219.980 530.117 Td /F2 12.0 Tf [(see)] TJ ET BT 235.304 530.117 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [( the paintings removed from Pompeii and Herculaneum? Fitzon )] TJ ET BT 34.016 515.861 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(believes there is room for doubt. One of Goethe?s most favorable impressions while touring the site was the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 501.605 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Tomb of Mamia, with its semi-circular stone bench from which one gained a picturesque view of the Bay of )] TJ ET BT 34.016 487.349 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Naples: ?a magnificent place, worthy of the splendid idea? \(p. 16\). Through an irony of which Goethe was )] TJ ET BT 34.016 473.093 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(probably unaware, that very bench \(which weary visitors can still enjoy\) had been removed and taken to the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 458.837 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(royal Herculaneum museum, and only a short time before his visit returned to its original location in )] TJ ET BT 34.016 444.581 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Pompeii as one of the first visitor-friendly gestures of the royal patron. If the account of his visit in 1787 was )] TJ ET BT 34.016 430.325 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(not published until 30 years after it took place \(1816\), how and why did Goethe modify his impressions? A )] TJ ET BT 34.016 416.069 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(dozen years later \(1827?30\) he pronounced what were to be his last words on Pompeian painting, based on )] TJ ET BT 34.016 401.813 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(coloured impressions by W. Zahn and W. Ternite. Despite such mediated experience, Goethe?s approval )] TJ ET BT 34.016 387.557 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(?made it possible to appreciate the special quality of these works of art without measuring them against the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 373.301 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(ideal of classical art? \(p. 33\). At the risk of infinite regress, dare we ask what is meant here by ?classical art??)] TJ ET BT 34.016 347.045 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(With the end of Napoleon?s power on the continent, travelers descended upon Pompeii in an economy )] TJ ET BT 34.016 332.789 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(version of the earlier Grand Tour. The French themselves were among the most enthusiastic visitors. )] TJ ET BT 34.016 318.533 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Genevieve Lively writes on Thophile Gautier?s )] TJ ET BT 270.632 318.533 Td /F2 12.0 Tf [(Arria Marcella)] TJ ET BT 343.628 318.533 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [( \(1852\), which dealt with a young man, )] TJ ET BT 34.016 304.277 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Octavien, and his fetishist obsession with the volcanic impression of a young woman?s bosom that he had )] TJ ET BT 34.016 290.021 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(seen in the Naples Museum. \(It really existed at one time.\) Gautier?s tale marks the first appearance of the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 275.765 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(femme fatale Arria Marcella, who had perished in the cellar of the Villa of Diomedes unearthed in 1773. )] TJ ET BT 34.016 261.509 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Briefly visible at Pompeii )] TJ ET BT 160.688 261.509 Td /F2 12.0 Tf [(in situ)] TJ ET BT 190.364 261.509 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(, it was taken for its safety to the Royal Museum at Portici, and eventually )] TJ ET BT 34.016 247.253 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(\(c. 1825\) to the Naples Museum, where it enjoyed the status of one of the most renowned fetishes of the 19th )] TJ ET BT 34.016 232.997 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(century. Its place in Pompeii ? since fetishes never die ? was apparently taken by a stain on the wall, )] TJ ET BT 34.016 218.741 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(recorded and transformed by the painter Thodore Chassriau in his oil painting of the )] TJ ET BT 451.940 218.741 Td /F2 12.0 Tf [(Tepidarium)] TJ ET BT 507.944 218.741 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [( at )] TJ ET BT 34.016 204.485 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Pompeii \(1853\). This is the argument of Sarah Betzer, bolstered by her comparison of Chassriau?s )] TJ ET BT 34.016 190.229 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(annotated drawing of the stained wall with his painting of the women?s bath dominated by a single, striking )] TJ ET BT 34.016 175.973 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(figure )] TJ ET BT 65.672 175.973 Td /F2 12.0 Tf [( demi-nue)] TJ ET BT 119.324 175.973 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(: the very image of Arria Marcella.)] TJ ET BT 34.016 149.717 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(The Englishman Edward Bulwer-Lytton?s )] TJ ET BT 240.656 149.717 Td /F2 12.0 Tf [(Last Days of Pompeii)] TJ ET BT 344.324 149.717 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [( \(1834\) rates two essays. Stephen Harrison )] TJ ET BT 34.016 135.461 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(demonstrates the role played by the antiquarian Sir William Gell in reconstructing the novel?s domestic )] TJ ET BT 34.016 121.205 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(interiors, and Meilee D. Bridges explores the author?s effort to recreate ?necromantic pathos? \(p. 92\) by )] TJ ET BT 34.016 106.949 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(filling the city?s buildings with ancient souls. Much of the novel?s appeal derived from the description, )] TJ ET BT 34.016 92.693 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(drawn from life, of the domestic spaces in which the characters moved, including the recently excavated )] TJ ET BT 34.016 78.437 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(?House of the Tragic Poet,? which gave Bulwer-Lytton material for the character of his hero the Athenian )] TJ ET BT 34.016 64.181 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Glaucus. \(Of those authors who deal with Bulwer-Lytton in this collection, only Shelley Hales considers his )] TJ ET BT 34.016 49.925 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(formidable reputation as an occultist.\) The arc of English literature is nicely completed by the editors? )] TJ ET endstream endobj 18 0 obj << /Type /Page /Parent 3 0 R /Contents 19 0 R >> endobj 19 0 obj << /Length 7690 >> stream 0.000 0.000 0.000 rg 0.502 0.502 0.502 RG 0.75 w 0 J [ ] 0 d BT 34.016 796.469 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(interview of Robert Harris in response to his well-researched and gripping novel, )] TJ ET BT 426.272 796.469 Td /F2 12.0 Tf [(Pompeii )] TJ ET BT 469.268 796.469 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(\(2003\), no less )] TJ ET BT 34.016 782.213 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(indebted to real archaeological sites than its 19th-century predecessor. Particularly enlightening is Harris?s )] TJ ET BT 34.016 767.957 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(explanation of how he had the idea that the first signs of Pompeii?s fate could be detected in the failure of )] TJ ET BT 34.016 753.701 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(infrastructure noted on the other side of the Bay of Naples.)] TJ ET BT 34.016 727.445 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Since Pompeii?s fate as preview of the end of the world \(and decadent humanity?s responsibility for God?s )] TJ ET BT 34.016 713.189 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(vengeance\) is the chief reason for the city?s popularity in the 19th century, it stood to reason that some )] TJ ET BT 34.016 698.933 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(virtuous persons, namely Christians \(some awaiting execution in the amphitheatre\) would escape the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 684.677 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(volcano?s fury. Eric M. Moormann discusses five novelists \(French, German, and English\) who wrote )] TJ ET BT 34.016 670.421 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(edifying fiction, mainly for a young audience during the third quarter of the 19th century. As in Bulwer-)] TJ ET BT 34.016 656.165 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Lytton?s novel, where the regenerate young Athenians escape destruction, leaving the decadent Romans to )] TJ ET BT 34.016 641.909 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(perish, many of the Christians who appeared in these novels escape the volcano. There is most definitely a )] TJ ET BT 34.016 627.653 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(theme here.)] TJ ET BT 34.016 601.397 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(One of a kind is Daniel Orrells? essay on Freudian archaeology. The example of Pompeii was of great help )] TJ ET BT 34.016 587.141 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(to the father of psychoanalysis, and Orrells argues well that this metaphor was no mere diversion for Freud )] TJ ET BT 34.016 572.885 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(as he sought to explain the )] TJ ET BT 164.672 572.885 Td /F2 12.0 Tf [(Aetiology of Hysteria)] TJ ET BT 267.332 572.885 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [( \(1896\). Neither was Freud?s long essay of 1907 on )] TJ ET BT 34.016 558.629 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Jensen?s )] TJ ET BT 79.004 558.629 Td /F2 12.0 Tf [(Gradiva)] TJ ET BT 119.000 558.629 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [( \(1903\), another novel of fetishist obsession with a long dead woman of Pompeii. Orrells )] TJ ET BT 34.016 544.373 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(goes to great length in his explanation of Freud?s lapidary conclusion to an archaeological analogy in the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 530.117 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(earlier work: )] TJ ET BT 98.660 530.117 Td /F2 12.0 Tf [(Saxa loquuntur! )] TJ ET BT 179.324 530.117 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(\(?The stones speak!?\). While this may have bewildered some men of science )] TJ ET BT 34.016 515.861 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(at the time, it is preaching to the converted among archaeologists. When Orrells turns his attention to )] TJ ET BT 34.016 501.605 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Derrida?s analysis of Jensen?s hero?s predicament in )] TJ ET BT 292.280 501.605 Td /F2 12.0 Tf [(Archive Fever)] TJ ET BT 360.584 501.605 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [( \(1996\) he is able to speculate on why )] TJ ET BT 34.016 487.349 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(we dig: ?we wish that the archive and the archive of that event might be one and the same thing? \(p. 198\). )] TJ ET BT 34.016 473.093 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(We dig in order to fill a void.)] TJ ET BT 34.016 446.837 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(This theme was explored in another medium by Roberto Rossellini in his 1953 film )] TJ ET BT 438.008 446.837 Td /F2 12.0 Tf [(Journey to Italy)] TJ ET BT 513.992 446.837 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [( \()] TJ ET BT 34.016 432.581 Td /F2 12.0 Tf [(Viaggio in Italia)] TJ ET BT 113.360 432.581 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(\), the subject of Matthew Fox?s provocative essay. In this notoriously inscrutable film )] TJ ET BT 34.016 418.325 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(script, a visit to Pompeii to witness the unearthing of the bodies of two joined lovers has a profound effect )] TJ ET BT 34.016 404.069 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(on an English couple who have been experiencing their own difficulties. The unforgettable scene, as )] TJ ET BT 34.016 389.813 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(archaeologists remove the ashes from the lovers? bodies cast in plaster, works on the actors and the audience )] TJ ET BT 34.016 375.557 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(like a visit to the underworld did in earlier literature. Although the resurrection scene has been staged by the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 361.301 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(archaeologists \(notorious for this sort of behavior at Pompeii\) and the filmmaker by reburying genuine casts )] TJ ET BT 34.016 347.045 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(that had been previously excavated, the emergence of body forms and faces carries archetypal significance.)] TJ ET BT 34.016 320.789 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(In her essay on Pompeii in the modern consciousness, Joanna Paul discusses the poet Primo Levi?s )] TJ ET BT 34.016 306.533 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(comparison of a girl-child of Pompeii with Anne Frank and an anonymous victim of the atomic bomb )] TJ ET BT 34.016 292.277 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(dropped on Hiroshima \(?only a shadow printed on the wall by the light of a thousand suns? p. 341\) ? the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 278.021 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(latter grimly paralleled in this volume by Chassriau?s painted vision in the cellar of the Villa of Diomedes. )] TJ ET BT 34.016 263.765 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Paul further discusses Pompeii as archetype for cities destroyed by bombing in the Second World War and )] TJ ET BT 34.016 249.509 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(the remarkably timed eruption in March 1944 of Europe?s most dangerous volcano.)] TJ ET BT 34.016 223.253 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Because Pompeii offers the most complete vision of life in the ancient world, it makes the perfect )] TJ ET BT 34.016 208.997 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(introduction to the experience based introduction to Latin that comprises the first part of the Cambridge )] TJ ET BT 34.016 194.741 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Latin Course as told by the editors in a separate chapter. The same quality appealed to Bulwer-Lytton in )] TJ ET BT 34.016 180.485 Td /F2 12.0 Tf [(The Last Days of Pompeii)] TJ ET BT 158.684 180.485 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [( and to Robert Harris in his novel, )] TJ ET BT 325.004 180.485 Td /F2 12.0 Tf [(Pompeii)] TJ ET BT 365.000 180.485 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(. Like both of these works, the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 166.229 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Cambridge Latin Course has had massive appeal, selling ?around 4 million books? \(p. 357\) to pupils in the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 151.973 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(English speaking world and the Netherlands since its introduction in 1971. The family saga of Caecilius, )] TJ ET BT 34.016 137.717 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(which centers on a real house in Pompeii, has now animated specific neighborhoods of the excavations for a )] TJ ET BT 34.016 123.461 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(large number of visitors that continues to increase from year to year, assuring the continuing creative tension )] TJ ET BT 34.016 109.205 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(in popular imagination between Pompeii as reality \(?as it really was?\) and Pompeii as construct or )] TJ ET BT 34.016 94.949 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(simulacrum.)] TJ ET BT 34.016 68.693 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(As the serious damage inflicted on the city by seasonal rains and inadequate maintenance in recent years has )] TJ ET BT 34.016 54.437 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(made clear, Pompeii is constantly changing, usually for the worse. Nevertheless, some discoveries are made )] TJ ET endstream endobj 20 0 obj << /Type /Page /Parent 3 0 R /Annots [ 22 0 R 24 0 R 26 0 R ] /Contents 21 0 R >> endobj 21 0 obj << /Length 2550 >> stream 0.000 0.000 0.000 rg 0.502 0.502 0.502 RG 0.75 w 0 J [ ] 0 d BT 34.016 796.469 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(from year to year, often adding some new dimension to the site. The modern visitor may feel gratified to see )] TJ ET BT 34.016 782.213 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(some of the same sights \(and sites\) as Beckford, Goethe, Chassriau, and Bergman did, but much of what )] TJ ET BT 34.016 767.957 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(these illustrious visitors experienced in their time has now vanished, only to be experienced or resurrected in )] TJ ET BT 34.016 753.701 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(their surviving art works and recollections. For just that reason, the archaeological site of Pompeii is )] TJ ET BT 34.016 739.445 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(virtually indistinguishable from its simulacra ? from its reception. There is no moral to be drawn from )] TJ ET BT 34.016 725.189 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(recognizing this double existence: it is a gift of post-modernity that we can profit from. The editors of )] TJ ET BT 34.016 710.933 Td /F2 12.0 Tf [(Pompeii in the Public Imagination)] TJ ET BT 200.012 710.933 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [( have given us a stimulating and provocative collection of essays in )] TJ ET BT 34.016 696.677 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(interpretation of this ruin that changes from year to year, yet always remains the same.)] TJ ET BT 34.016 670.421 Td /F3 12.0 Tf [(Other reviews:)] TJ ET BT 34.016 656.165 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(World Archaeology)] TJ ET 0.000 0.000 0.800 rg BT 34.016 641.909 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(http://www.world-archaeology.com/books/book-review-pompeii-in-the-public-imagination-from-its-)] TJ ET 0.000 0.000 0.800 RG 0.24 w 0 J [ ] 0 d 34.016 640.515 m 519.284 640.515 l S BT 34.016 627.653 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(rediscovery-to-today-3/)] TJ ET 0.24 w 0 J [ ] 0 d 34.016 626.259 m 147.320 626.259 l S 0.000 0.000 0.000 rg BT 150.320 627.653 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [([2])] TJ ET 0.502 0.502 0.502 RG 0.75 w 0 J [ ] 0 d 34.391 622.927 526.499 1.500 re S BT 34.016 605.147 Td /F3 12.0 Tf [(Source URL:)] TJ ET 0.000 0.000 0.800 rg BT 104.672 605.147 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(http://www.history.ac.uk/reviews/review/1284)] TJ ET 0.000 0.000 0.800 RG 0.24 w 0 J [ ] 0 d 104.672 603.753 m 328.316 603.753 l S 0.000 0.000 0.000 rg BT 34.016 578.776 Td /F3 12.0 Tf [(Links:)] TJ ET BT 34.016 564.376 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [([1] http://www.history.ac.uk/reviews/item/24516)] TJ ET BT 34.016 550.091 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [([2] http://www.world-archaeology.com/books/book-review-pompeii-in-the-public-imagination-from-its-)] TJ ET BT 34.016 535.720 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(rediscovery-to-today-3/)] TJ ET endstream endobj 22 0 obj << /Type /Annot /Subtype /Link /A 23 0 R /Border [0 0 0] /H /I /Rect [ 34.0157 640.8295 519.2837 652.7095 ] >> endobj 23 0 obj << /Type /Action /S /URI /URI (http://www.world-archaeology.com/books/book-review-pompeii-in-the-public-imagination-from-its-rediscovery-to-today-3/) >> endobj 24 0 obj << /Type /Annot /Subtype /Link /A 25 0 R /Border [0 0 0] /H /I /Rect [ 34.0157 626.5735 147.3197 638.4535 ] >> endobj 25 0 obj << /Type /Action /S /URI /URI (http://www.world-archaeology.com/books/book-review-pompeii-in-the-public-imagination-from-its-rediscovery-to-today-3/) >> endobj 26 0 obj << /Type /Annot /Subtype /Link /A 27 0 R /Border [0 0 0] /H /I /Rect [ 104.6717 604.0675 328.3157 615.9475 ] >> endobj 27 0 obj << /Type /Action /S /URI /URI (http://www.history.ac.uk/reviews/review/1284) >> endobj xref 0 28 0000000000 65535 f 0000000008 00000 n 0000000073 00000 n 0000000119 00000 n 0000000349 00000 n 0000000386 00000 n 0000000570 00000 n 0000000652 00000 n 0000004903 00000 n 0000005012 00000 n 0000005122 00000 n 0000005231 00000 n 0000008792 00000 n 0000008920 00000 n 0000009004 00000 n 0000009069 00000 n 0000016506 00000 n 0000016571 00000 n 0000025053 00000 n 0000025118 00000 n 0000032861 00000 n 0000032959 00000 n 0000035562 00000 n 0000035689 00000 n 0000035858 00000 n 0000035985 00000 n 0000036154 00000 n 0000036282 00000 n trailer << /Size 28 /Root 1 0 R /Info 5 0 R >> startxref 36378 %%EOF