%PDF-1.3 1 0 obj << /Type /Catalog /Outlines 2 0 R /Pages 3 0 R >> endobj 2 0 obj << /Type /Outlines /Count 0 >> endobj 3 0 obj << /Type /Pages /Kids [6 0 R 14 0 R 16 0 R 18 0 R ] /Count 4 /Resources << /ProcSet 4 0 R /Font << /F1 8 0 R /F2 9 0 R /F3 10 0 R >> /XObject << /I1 11 0 R >> >> /MediaBox [0.000 0.000 595.280 841.890] >> endobj 4 0 obj [/PDF /Text /ImageC ] endobj 5 0 obj << /Creator (DOMPDF) /CreationDate (D:20140902065821+01'00') /ModDate (D:20140902065821+01'00') /Title (Europe after Rome: A New Cultural History 500-1000) >> endobj 6 0 obj << /Type /Page /Parent 3 0 R /Annots [ 12 0 R ] /Contents 7 0 R >> endobj 7 0 obj << /Length 1794 >> stream q 381.750 0 0 120.000 34.016 687.874 cm /I1 Do Q 0.000 0.000 0.000 rg BT 34.016 676.469 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Published on )] TJ ET BT 99.356 676.469 Td /F2 12.0 Tf [(Reviews in History)] TJ ET BT 190.016 676.469 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [( \()] TJ ET 0.000 0.000 0.800 rg BT 197.012 676.469 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(http://www.history.ac.uk/reviews)] TJ ET 0.000 0.000 0.800 RG 0.24 w 0 J [ ] 0 d 197.012 675.075 m 357.332 675.075 l S 0.000 0.000 0.000 rg BT 357.332 676.469 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(\))] TJ ET 0.502 0.502 0.502 RG 0.75 w 0 J [ ] 0 d 34.391 653.743 526.499 1.500 re S BT 34.016 615.321 Td /F3 18.0 Tf [(Europe after Rome: A New Cultural History 500-1000)] TJ ET BT 34.016 584.699 Td /F3 12.0 Tf [(Review Number:)] TJ ET BT 34.016 570.443 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(662)] TJ ET BT 34.016 556.187 Td /F3 12.0 Tf [(Publish date:)] TJ ET BT 34.016 541.931 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Wednesday, 30 April, 2008)] TJ ET BT 34.016 527.675 Td /F3 12.0 Tf [(Author:)] TJ ET BT 34.016 513.419 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Julia M. H. Smith)] TJ ET BT 34.016 499.163 Td /F3 12.0 Tf [(ISBN:)] TJ ET BT 34.016 484.907 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(9780199244270)] TJ ET BT 34.016 470.651 Td /F3 12.0 Tf [(Date of Publication:)] TJ ET BT 34.016 456.395 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(2005)] TJ ET BT 34.016 442.139 Td /F3 12.0 Tf [(Price:)] TJ ET BT 34.016 427.883 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(25.00)] TJ ET BT 34.016 413.627 Td /F3 12.0 Tf [(Pages:)] TJ ET BT 34.016 399.371 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(398pp.)] TJ ET BT 34.016 385.115 Td /F3 12.0 Tf [(Publisher:)] TJ ET BT 34.016 370.859 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Oxford University Press)] TJ ET BT 34.016 356.603 Td /F3 12.0 Tf [(Place of Publication:)] TJ ET BT 34.016 342.347 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Oxford)] TJ ET BT 34.016 328.091 Td /F3 12.0 Tf [(Reviewer:)] TJ ET BT 34.016 313.835 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Lynette Olson)] TJ ET endstream endobj 8 0 obj << /Type /Font /Subtype /Type1 /Name /F1 /BaseFont /Times-Roman /Encoding /WinAnsiEncoding >> endobj 9 0 obj << /Type /Font /Subtype /Type1 /Name /F2 /BaseFont /Times-Italic /Encoding /WinAnsiEncoding >> endobj 10 0 obj << /Type /Font /Subtype /Type1 /Name /F3 /BaseFont /Times-Bold /Encoding /WinAnsiEncoding >> endobj 11 0 obj << /Type /XObject /Subtype /Image /Width 509 /Height 160 /Filter /FlateDecode /DecodeParms << /Predictor 15 /Colors 3 /Columns 509 /BitsPerComponent 8>> /Mask [ 255 255 255 255 255 255 ] /ColorSpace /DeviceRGB /BitsPerComponent 8 /Length 3280>> stream x[EQ㎦fVttҒ +3O{?lGDQԯDrB^.ϯ%~'0۠/2>0AG_>0j0GCfE67>rB^}@  !&y+r?INp:erc b8f=rQC!~-Wf^^zF[)G 2ޯe7V_Go3Ke GEGOo8rώ#\1ZY~N6^H}yLxS-!:412V+u\-LSO?xVvZ|GjǮT_8EYJF=Tw^ 7GxfN/S:Ʌ~ʟtt?5n÷J'JcF-GVξx{rO~tJd;#a\7}|~y'>}c2C vR}f׈**h.)_&@pfzjsx:5;S\vKhM5j=!Cn+h"u]a EUN]jn=k<,:Ք>sU!ni~6EJ)¦72?G}[y}_vc$t?iSܟ2Zݞ,VN?_`='RFK1A2qv&X_lLRWY'%:I㢖zb_UEx\>&ɆBˏ~K@ \gYØU4}$8Dv!'Q'*+Εj(UCGo[#< 2Ja(sZi9fZKE Rn`u\9r^Zmɯ׹}mstO4uc~#'jEvۼ Dx[z ޏQ4KL5,5u3>i^uÒ-53ba ~,~/pyt1fMU'CVm:qv~=Y'Es"WsφG?l_kN5}],Ow7 uh`xƫ?zMl7ٻv$A(4Dl(wwH} ?=[=S;yC]^BK>㕪9`Z'Wj;E|:bf>kCԘ#RY,iv쵗~}n'"1u" *uO΄/2^Sxr(!/DD\~mJyZ!MmrA!#u[if|99WB WΡpp}w}sh#,\ &:%˳X?D3 %W0cC?o̲^} F3XLVn]Cߖiϧ!7}yZJ#P7]=)7Ρp;>> Ye^xx{Oafw{ ;>4gfLt ʊ:q%#r/)pv!O4wGh|dS ӣݽހ-gVUC'pBxrB^} 7JA^} /'8!`:r?}}],X  }6y!`/~Br?}Q< >k7vx"] ,' .3jn{-i}|~%-};b6#U)7繎kiEw 㤳:E}[޼c"rꬊ7Dc$~"/Y&zSd:tFȌCrʙ`7u .#[-<)j ?TGS(j~oTup(hjU4PlJ=}|it.ҽ@\wʨuXÞZcx18Wo<~ikOg,ވ\^?EneyZcc0[R١z|zv7_m:_n]a?osS3~j^ hD.a_X'KfBX6w wݶ"Oa:,bvhrWH[uCF-Xfc}>x+Rz)2N-B 7y^٨;[/vg? | |2Sve}=o䑰j[vWjF0{굦?VI~}xM(_TlG__+]:#к?S} c>GŸD7 !w{S{B =x7a?oE#)+Gz:o_4Q<;n?\tt7?mGCџQGu4kņOF>F?#} hP&ђߴM#u!.СtL2^#o nIk_i.~7tr@n 1P~3?.[]=S5b߮~Yo^HFH YBi8a4iom>CKgMy*;?zqEӕ` >zB9iFzC?XF?ޟIܰ펉A}{I5ᄊx%ez#Mp@rߎpi]IOVjzuJt\۰f׺u5><,J~PTJp1)}){9N {!`/> endstream endobj 12 0 obj << /Type /Annot /Subtype /Link /A 13 0 R /Border [0 0 0] /H /I /Rect [ 197.0117 675.3895 357.3317 687.2695 ] >> endobj 13 0 obj << /Type /Action /S /URI /URI (http://www.history.ac.uk/reviews) >> endobj 14 0 obj << /Type /Page /Parent 3 0 R /Contents 15 0 R >> endobj 15 0 obj << /Length 7724 >> stream 0.000 0.000 0.000 rg 0.502 0.502 0.502 RG 0.75 w 0 J [ ] 0 d BT 34.016 784.469 Td /F2 12.0 Tf [(Europe after Rome: A New Cultural History 500-1000)] TJ ET BT 295.676 784.469 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [( should be read completely by all early medievalists, )] TJ ET BT 34.016 770.213 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(who will then endeavour to assign relevant portions on student reading lists \(an example is given near the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 755.957 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(end of this review\) while urging the best and most interested students to read the whole thing. It is a )] TJ ET BT 34.016 741.701 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(carefully crafted study and survey: a 'cultural history' as the subtitle proclaims and 'a comparative )] TJ ET BT 34.016 727.445 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(ethnography of the early Middle Ages' as the introduction explains, addressing the problem: 'how did the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 713.189 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(men and women who lived between 500 and 1000 order their own worlds in social, cultural and political )] TJ ET BT 34.016 698.933 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(terms?' Analysis follows 'three interpretative threads': early medieval diversity, mindfulness of the Roman )] TJ ET BT 34.016 684.677 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(paradigm of power and dynamism. There are two chapters on the environment, the first about language and )] TJ ET BT 34.016 670.421 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(literacy, which of course relate to cultural historiography as well as history, and the second about the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 656.165 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(practical conditions of early medieval living. These are followed by two chapters on social relationships, the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 641.909 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(first about friendship and kinship, the second about gender relations. The next two chapters concern the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 627.653 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(social relations of production to power: of land and movable wealth with due attention to the gift economy. )] TJ ET BT 34.016 613.397 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(The final pair of chapters add the ideological dimension of the nexus between kingship and Christianity and )] TJ ET BT 34.016 599.141 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(of the Roman inheritance. These chapters, we are told in the introduction, 'function like transparent )] TJ ET BT 34.016 584.885 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(overlays', which is an excellent plan that would have benefited from reiteration in the conclusions to each )] TJ ET BT 34.016 570.629 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(chapter and in the epilogue. This review should be taken as a creative engagement with a book that is )] TJ ET BT 34.016 556.373 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(admired, even where criticisms of its approach are made.)] TJ ET BT 34.016 530.117 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Smith's book is a great and welcome corrective to the prevailing narrative of medieval history as a whole, )] TJ ET BT 34.016 515.861 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(centred as that narrative is on what was happening in France. To some extent this focus has reflected the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 501.605 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(outstanding contributions of French medievalists to scholarship. British scholars have made their own )] TJ ET BT 34.016 487.349 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(outstanding contributions of course but have tended to do so in their own compartment \(within which in )] TJ ET BT 34.016 473.093 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(living memory 'early medieval' meant Norman\). This compartment Professor Smith has resolutely broken )] TJ ET BT 34.016 458.837 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(down in her study which encompasses the British Isles in Europe, and if Britain and even more Ireland had )] TJ ET BT 34.016 444.581 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(distinctive features in the early Middle Ages, so did other regions of Europe. This is her theme of diversity. )] TJ ET BT 34.016 430.325 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Those who have felt uncomfortable with what the dominant narrative of medieval history leaves out will )] TJ ET BT 34.016 416.069 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(enjoy this book. Whether they will be prepared to jettison that dominant narrative is another matter.)] TJ ET BT 34.016 389.813 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(This is a work, as the epilogue points out, for 21st-century Europe, but the shadow of 19th- and 20th-century )] TJ ET BT 34.016 375.557 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(European history and historiography lies heavily on it, with results that may be surprising to readers who, )] TJ ET BT 34.016 361.301 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(like the present reviewer, are not Europeans. Perhaps we are less oppressed by the darker side of the recent )] TJ ET BT 34.016 347.045 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(history of what is never our own country as we study what, if again like the present reviewer we live in )] TJ ET BT 34.016 332.789 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(European settler societies, is the early history of our culture. Professor Smith is writing against the European )] TJ ET BT 34.016 318.533 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(ideology of nation building \(p. 256\). While the interests of modern European nationalism have been served )] TJ ET BT 34.016 304.277 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(by, and coloured the interpretation of, early medieval history, a Europe divided into several kingdoms, and )] TJ ET BT 34.016 290.021 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(European culture, had their origins in the early Middle Ages. It is not a question of teleology but of roots. )] TJ ET BT 34.016 275.765 Td /F2 12.0 Tf [(Of course)] TJ ET BT 81.008 275.765 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [( the period is interesting in its own right, but its interpretation is not aided by allowing it only a )] TJ ET BT 34.016 261.509 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(\(mainly\) Roman past. The awesome implications of Christian conversion for the formation of European )] TJ ET BT 34.016 247.253 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(culture, representing as it does the interplay of Christian, Roman and indigenous elements as people made )] TJ ET BT 34.016 232.997 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(their own Christianities \(cf. p. 224\), have had to await the emphasis on cultural history for the treatment they )] TJ ET BT 34.016 218.741 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(deserve, to which this book makes a notable contribution, including a very useful map on p. 221. Both past )] TJ ET BT 34.016 204.485 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(and future must be acknowledged.)] TJ ET BT 34.016 178.229 Td /F2 12.0 Tf [(Europe after Rome)] TJ ET BT 125.336 178.229 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [( is a history of all the people of early medieval Europe, including the female half )] TJ ET BT 34.016 163.973 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(throughout, and not just in chapter four, 'Men and Women'. My marginal notes to that chapter are often 'yes, )] TJ ET BT 34.016 149.717 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(but' because with all its merits this chapter does not quite do justice to the )] TJ ET BT 390.488 149.717 Td /F2 12.0 Tf [(relatively)] TJ ET BT 435.812 149.717 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [( better opportunities of )] TJ ET BT 34.016 135.461 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(women to access wealth and therefore power in the early Middle Ages than in the better organised period )] TJ ET BT 34.016 121.205 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(which came afterwards. On the one hand, the short paragraph here quoted says it all: 'Not even powerful )] TJ ET BT 34.016 106.949 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(early medieval kings such as Rothari and Charlemagne could bring social reality fully into line with )] TJ ET BT 34.016 92.693 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(prescriptive norms. In practice, women characteristically lived their lives in the interstices of ideology and )] TJ ET BT 34.016 78.437 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(convention. As we shall see, that gap was often considerable, a cause of vulnerability for some but of )] TJ ET BT 34.016 64.181 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(opportunity for others'\(p. 122\). Yet on p. 147 we are back to 'the disparities, sometimes negotiable, )] TJ ET BT 34.016 49.925 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(sometimes not, between women's experiences and men's opportunities'. In particular, the prevalence of the )] TJ ET endstream endobj 16 0 obj << /Type /Page /Parent 3 0 R /Contents 17 0 R >> endobj 17 0 obj << /Length 4937 >> stream 0.000 0.000 0.000 rg 0.502 0.502 0.502 RG 0.75 w 0 J [ ] 0 d BT 34.016 796.469 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(reverse dowry over the dowry is not recognised, even though an example of the latter is given at the bottom )] TJ ET BT 34.016 782.213 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(of p. 131: when Count Stephen wanted to marry the daughter of Count Regimund, the two counts 'reached )] TJ ET BT 34.016 767.957 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(agreement about the marital endowment Stephen would provide, and the couple were formally betrothed'. )] TJ ET BT 34.016 753.701 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Men were prepared to pay to marry in the early Middle Ages. The chapter makes the point that women were )] TJ ET BT 34.016 739.445 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(valued in the period. Its reference to women's finery but not men's on p. 118 could reinforce modern gender )] TJ ET BT 34.016 725.189 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(stereotypes, whereas it is made amply clear later on in the book that men had finery of their own \(p. 175\). A )] TJ ET BT 34.016 710.933 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(little further on, the account of Leudast 'catching the eye of Charibert's queen, Marcofeva', manages to )] TJ ET BT 34.016 696.677 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(trivialise her role, for he is first said to have become count of Tours 'by winning the attention of King )] TJ ET BT 34.016 682.421 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Charibert \(561-7\) and then his brother King Chilperic \(561-84\)' whereas his rise began when Queen )] TJ ET BT 34.016 668.165 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Marcofeva put him in charge of her stables. These matters may seem trivial, but they add up to a slightly )] TJ ET BT 34.016 653.909 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(misleading impression. We need to emphasise that the early Middle Ages are one of the most interesting )] TJ ET BT 34.016 639.653 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(periods in women's history.)] TJ ET BT 34.016 613.397 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(This is a book for those who already know what happened in early medieval history, or are prepared to go )] TJ ET BT 34.016 599.141 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(elsewhere to find out. Events and their dates have been relegated to a fine chronology at the end of the book, )] TJ ET BT 34.016 584.885 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [('standing staring all together, / Like garden gods', with a smile one quotes Byron and notes a few occasions )] TJ ET BT 34.016 570.629 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(in the text where references to what happened must be intruded \(pp. 171, 201 and 271, the last )] TJ ET BT 34.016 556.373 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(unsurprisingly being the Frankish-papal alliance in the mid-8th century\). The book is full of illustrative )] TJ ET BT 34.016 542.117 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(details, some of them quite wonderful, generally dated and referenced \(although one would like to know the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 527.861 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(source for the Spanish writing tablets on p. 43\), but one has to read it through to find them. Examples are the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 513.605 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(link between horses and display on p. 175: in the late 8th-century Pope Hadrian I was to ride only the best in )] TJ ET BT 34.016 499.349 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(procession, but it is hard to outdo the account of Boniface of Canossa on the way to his bride Beatrix in the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 485.093 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(early 11th century, who shod his horse with easily cast silver shoes so that \(quoting from the primary source\) )] TJ ET BT 34.016 470.837 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [('this way the people might find out who he was'! Among the details readers may discover items of specific )] TJ ET BT 34.016 456.581 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(use to their own research, either directly or comparatively as in the case about to be given. For this reviewer )] TJ ET BT 34.016 442.325 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(the Bavarian poem about St Peter from c.900 \(pp. 283, 285\) brought to mind a poem about St Samson of Dol )] TJ ET BT 34.016 428.069 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(in Brittany composed about the same time which declared: 'For the Lord sent patriarchs and prophets, / Sent )] TJ ET BT 34.016 413.813 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(apostles, teachers, to scatter the seeds / Of life always everywhere throughout the whole world. / From those )] TJ ET BT 34.016 399.557 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(no one is acknowledged to have come to us / Except that Samson finally had come by order of the Lord; / )] TJ ET BT 34.016 385.301 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Gaul the teacher had not yet taught us uncultivated ones / The coming of Peter by which he blessed the right )] TJ ET BT 34.016 371.045 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(of Rome.' Discussion in this part of the book highlights how exceptional is my piece of evidence to the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 356.789 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(attention to Rome which 'signalled a strong desire for attachment to authoritative narratives of Christian )] TJ ET BT 34.016 342.533 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(origins and apostolic authenticity in the absence of locally available proofs' \(p. 288\). In Dol they had the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 328.277 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(latter - yet more early medieval diversity.)] TJ ET endstream endobj 18 0 obj << /Type /Page /Parent 3 0 R /Annots [ 20 0 R 22 0 R ] /Contents 19 0 R >> endobj 19 0 obj << /Length 6004 >> stream 0.000 0.000 0.000 rg 0.502 0.502 0.502 RG 0.75 w 0 J [ ] 0 d BT 34.016 784.469 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(While the early medieval Western focus on Rome as a Christian cult centre and acknowledgement of the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 770.213 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(pope as the most authoritative bishop in Christendom are beyond dispute, my most weighty criticism of this )] TJ ET BT 34.016 755.957 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(excellent book lies in its treatment of that city in the final chapter, 'Rome and the Peoples of Europe'. It is not )] TJ ET BT 34.016 741.701 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(just that the city of Rome was geographically marginal in the period \(as it was from more than one )] TJ ET BT 34.016 727.445 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(perspective: the extent to which Rome was influenced by Byzantium deserved consideration\); nor that it was )] TJ ET BT 34.016 713.189 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(also politically marginal. 'For the three weeks of Conrad's visit, Rome functioned as Europe's political centre' )] TJ ET BT 34.016 698.933 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(\(p. 279\) in the early 11th century, but this was not the normal state of affairs, however much Otto III might )] TJ ET BT 34.016 684.677 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(have earlier wished to the contrary, as the bases of power in Europe lay in the north. Rome's peripheral )] TJ ET BT 34.016 670.421 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(position in the foregoing respects is indeed acknowledged in the book. The real problem is that, paradoxical )] TJ ET BT 34.016 656.165 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(as it might sound, Rome was )] TJ ET BT 175.688 656.165 Td /F2 12.0 Tf [(ecclesiastically)] TJ ET BT 249.008 656.165 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [( marginal. Rome reacted to developments elsewhere in the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 641.909 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Western church. It only added )] TJ ET BT 181.976 641.909 Td /F2 12.0 Tf [(filioque)] TJ ET BT 218.648 641.909 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [( to the creed at the end of the early Middle Ages. It was appealed to as )] TJ ET BT 34.016 627.653 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(a standard by the initiative of others elsewhere in the church. And, most significantly, the reform movement )] TJ ET BT 34.016 613.397 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(began further north. Monastic reformers, clerical and lay, placed their protgs directly under papal control. )] TJ ET BT 34.016 599.141 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Church reformers, clerical and lay, sought to improve diocesan affairs, and eventually reform reached the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 584.885 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(papacy, which only then became the nerve centre of the church. In the circumstances one may ask if Rome )] TJ ET BT 34.016 570.629 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(\(and we are assured in the epilogue that aside from the book's subtitle it is the city that is meant\) is the best )] TJ ET BT 34.016 556.373 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(centralising feature to emphasise amid early medieval diversity, and if it does justice to the dynamism of )] TJ ET BT 34.016 542.117 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(other regions of Europe.)] TJ ET BT 34.016 515.861 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(By and large, however, one can only praise and profit from the fine analysis offered by this book. Its )] TJ ET BT 34.016 501.605 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(interdisciplinary evidence and approach are good to see, although it was written just a shade too early to )] TJ ET BT 34.016 487.349 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(make use of the genetic evidence which has such profound implications for the period \(if this data is indeed )] TJ ET BT 34.016 473.093 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(correctly interpreted as indicating relative stability rather than mobility of populations\). One welcomes the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 458.837 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(statements that early medieval Europe was 'document-minded' \(p. 43 - the whole of chapter one is a )] TJ ET BT 34.016 444.581 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(welcome addition to the reading list for my tutorial about Rosamond McKitterick vs. the traditionalists on )] TJ ET BT 34.016 430.325 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(the extent of Carolingian literacy\), that Justinian's plague was indeed bubonic \(p. 61\), that the argument for )] TJ ET BT 34.016 416.069 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(female infanticide is unconvincing \(p. 70\), that feuds were intra- as well as inter-family \(p. 111\) and that )] TJ ET BT 34.016 401.813 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Germanic kingship at the beginning of the Middle Ages was not sacral: 'If early Germanic-speaking peoples )] TJ ET BT 34.016 387.557 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(had ever regarded their kings within a cosmological context, the huge upheavals and transformations of the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 373.301 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(4th and 5th centuries had been far too disruptive to sustain such beliefs' \(p. 247\). Each chapter includes a )] TJ ET BT 34.016 359.045 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(helpful map of places mentioned therein. Proofreading is virtually immaculate \(only a stray 'the' was spotted )] TJ ET BT 34.016 344.789 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(on p. 195\). The book ends with a superb bibliography \(the only improvement that can be suggested would be )] TJ ET BT 34.016 330.533 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(to list the journals devoted to the early Middle Ages\) which deserves the highest praise of all.)] TJ ET BT 34.016 304.277 Td /F3 12.0 Tf [(Other reviews:)] TJ ET BT 34.016 290.021 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(h-net-reviews)] TJ ET 0.000 0.000 0.800 rg BT 34.016 275.765 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(http://www.h-net.org/reviews/showrev.php)] TJ ET 0.000 0.000 0.800 RG 0.24 w 0 J [ ] 0 d 34.016 274.371 m 240.992 274.371 l S 0.000 0.000 0.000 rg BT 243.992 275.765 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [([2])] TJ ET 0.502 0.502 0.502 RG 0.75 w 0 J [ ] 0 d 34.391 271.039 526.499 1.500 re S BT 34.016 253.259 Td /F3 12.0 Tf [(Source URL:)] TJ ET 0.000 0.000 0.800 rg BT 104.672 253.259 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(http://www.history.ac.uk/reviews/review/662)] TJ ET 0.000 0.000 0.800 RG 0.24 w 0 J [ ] 0 d 104.672 251.865 m 322.316 251.865 l S 0.000 0.000 0.000 rg BT 34.016 226.888 Td /F3 12.0 Tf [(Links:)] TJ ET BT 34.016 212.488 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [([1] http://www.history.ac.uk/reviews/item/3636)] TJ ET BT 34.016 198.088 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [([2] http://www.h-net.org/reviews/showrev.php?id=12710)] TJ ET endstream endobj 20 0 obj << /Type /Annot /Subtype /Link /A 21 0 R /Border [0 0 0] /H /I /Rect [ 34.0157 274.6855 240.9917 286.5655 ] >> endobj 21 0 obj << /Type /Action /S /URI /URI (http://www.h-net.org/reviews/showrev.php?id=12710) >> endobj 22 0 obj << /Type /Annot /Subtype /Link /A 23 0 R /Border [0 0 0] /H /I /Rect [ 104.6717 252.1795 322.3157 264.0595 ] >> endobj 23 0 obj << /Type /Action /S /URI /URI (http://www.history.ac.uk/reviews/review/662) >> endobj xref 0 24 0000000000 65535 f 0000000008 00000 n 0000000073 00000 n 0000000119 00000 n 0000000342 00000 n 0000000379 00000 n 0000000553 00000 n 0000000635 00000 n 0000002481 00000 n 0000002590 00000 n 0000002700 00000 n 0000002809 00000 n 0000006370 00000 n 0000006498 00000 n 0000006582 00000 n 0000006647 00000 n 0000014424 00000 n 0000014489 00000 n 0000019479 00000 n 0000019570 00000 n 0000025627 00000 n 0000025754 00000 n 0000025855 00000 n 0000025983 00000 n trailer << /Size 24 /Root 1 0 R /Info 5 0 R >> startxref 26078 %%EOF