%PDF-1.3 1 0 obj << /Type /Catalog /Outlines 2 0 R /Pages 3 0 R >> endobj 2 0 obj << /Type /Outlines /Count 0 >> endobj 3 0 obj << /Type /Pages /Kids [6 0 R 14 0 R 16 0 R 18 0 R ] /Count 4 /Resources << /ProcSet 4 0 R /Font << /F1 8 0 R /F2 9 0 R /F3 10 0 R >> /XObject << /I1 11 0 R >> >> /MediaBox [0.000 0.000 595.280 841.890] >> endobj 4 0 obj [/PDF /Text /ImageC ] endobj 5 0 obj << /Creator (DOMPDF) /CreationDate (D:20150829223650+01'00') /ModDate (D:20150829223650+01'00') /Title (Guarantee of Peace: The League of Nations in British Policy 1914-1925) >> endobj 6 0 obj << /Type /Page /Parent 3 0 R /Annots [ 12 0 R ] /Contents 7 0 R >> endobj 7 0 obj << /Length 4046 >> stream q 381.750 0 0 120.000 34.016 687.874 cm /I1 Do Q 0.000 0.000 0.000 rg BT 34.016 676.469 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Published on )] TJ ET BT 99.356 676.469 Td /F2 12.0 Tf [(Reviews in History)] TJ ET BT 190.016 676.469 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [( \()] TJ ET 0.000 0.000 0.800 rg BT 197.012 676.469 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(http://www.history.ac.uk/reviews)] TJ ET 0.000 0.000 0.800 RG 0.24 w 0 J [ ] 0 d 197.012 675.075 m 357.332 675.075 l S 0.000 0.000 0.000 rg BT 357.332 676.469 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(\))] TJ ET 0.502 0.502 0.502 RG 0.75 w 0 J [ ] 0 d 34.391 653.743 526.499 1.500 re S BT 34.016 615.321 Td /F3 18.0 Tf [(Guarantee of Peace: The League of Nations in British Policy 1914-)] TJ ET BT 34.016 593.937 Td /F3 18.0 Tf [(1925)] TJ ET BT 34.016 266.195 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Peter Yearwood has carried out impressively extensive research to produce this account of how British )] TJ ET BT 34.016 251.939 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(foreign policy was closely linked to the formation and operation of the League of Nations in its early years. )] TJ ET BT 34.016 237.683 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(An enormous amount of detail is densely packed into every page which makes the book a mine of )] TJ ET BT 34.016 223.427 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(information for academics working in this field, though for this reason it could prove rather daunting for the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 209.171 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(casual reader, or under-graduate student. The attention to detail and depth of analysis enable the author to )] TJ ET BT 34.016 194.915 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(challenge some of the accepted views of Britain?s relationship with the League, and in some instances to )] TJ ET BT 34.016 180.659 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(present a very different interpretation from the traditional idea of British reluctance to engage with the newly-)] TJ ET BT 34.016 166.403 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(formed League.)] TJ ET BT 34.016 140.147 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Yearwood?s own explanation of the genesis of the book sets the tone: he began his research into Britain?s )] TJ ET BT 34.016 125.891 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(relationship with the League expecting it to lead him to follow an ?established paradigm? \(p. 2\), supporting )] TJ ET BT 34.016 111.635 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(an established historiographical debate, but instead the documents led him to conclude that Britain had, in )] TJ ET BT 34.016 97.379 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(fact, engaged fully in the idea of a league of nations from a very early stage of the First World War. Their )] TJ ET BT 34.016 83.123 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(aim was ?a solution to practical problems rather than ? the application of a theory? \(p. 2\) but nevertheless, a )] TJ ET BT 34.016 68.867 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(commitment to such a league was evident almost from the outbreak of war in 1914. Initially the idea behind )] TJ ET BT 34.016 54.611 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(the league was a policy of ?Atlanticism?, which would bind British policy closely to that of the United )] TJ ET BT 34.016 563.315 Td /F3 12.0 Tf [(Review Number:)] TJ ET BT 34.016 549.059 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(810)] TJ ET BT 34.016 534.803 Td /F3 12.0 Tf [(Publish date:)] TJ ET BT 34.016 520.547 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Thursday, 1 October, 2009)] TJ ET BT 34.016 506.291 Td /F3 12.0 Tf [(Author:)] TJ ET BT 34.016 492.035 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Peter Yearwood)] TJ ET BT 34.016 477.779 Td /F3 12.0 Tf [(ISBN:)] TJ ET BT 34.016 463.523 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(9780199226733)] TJ ET BT 34.016 449.267 Td /F3 12.0 Tf [(Date of Publication:)] TJ ET BT 34.016 435.011 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(2009)] TJ ET BT 34.016 420.755 Td /F3 12.0 Tf [(Price:)] TJ ET BT 34.016 406.499 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(65.00)] TJ ET BT 34.016 392.243 Td /F3 12.0 Tf [(Pages:)] TJ ET BT 34.016 377.987 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(432pp.)] TJ ET BT 34.016 363.731 Td /F3 12.0 Tf [(Publisher:)] TJ ET BT 34.016 349.475 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Oxford University Press)] TJ ET BT 34.016 335.219 Td /F3 12.0 Tf [(Place of Publication:)] TJ ET BT 34.016 320.963 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Oxford)] TJ ET BT 34.016 306.707 Td /F3 12.0 Tf [(Reviewer:)] TJ ET BT 34.016 292.451 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Carolyn Kitching)] TJ ET endstream endobj 8 0 obj << /Type /Font /Subtype /Type1 /Name /F1 /BaseFont /Times-Roman /Encoding /WinAnsiEncoding >> endobj 9 0 obj << /Type /Font /Subtype /Type1 /Name /F2 /BaseFont /Times-Italic /Encoding /WinAnsiEncoding >> endobj 10 0 obj << /Type /Font /Subtype /Type1 /Name /F3 /BaseFont /Times-Bold /Encoding /WinAnsiEncoding >> endobj 11 0 obj << /Type /XObject /Subtype /Image /Width 509 /Height 160 /Filter /FlateDecode /DecodeParms << /Predictor 15 /Colors 3 /Columns 509 /BitsPerComponent 8>> /Mask [ 255 255 255 255 255 255 ] /ColorSpace /DeviceRGB /BitsPerComponent 8 /Length 3280>> stream x[EQ㎦fVttҒ +3O{?lGDQԯDrB^.ϯ%~'0۠/2>0AG_>0j0GCfE67>rB^}@  !&y+r?INp:erc b8f=rQC!~-Wf^^zF[)G 2ޯe7V_Go3Ke GEGOo8rώ#\1ZY~N6^H}yLxS-!:412V+u\-LSO?xVvZ|GjǮT_8EYJF=Tw^ 7GxfN/S:Ʌ~ʟtt?5n÷J'JcF-GVξx{rO~tJd;#a\7}|~y'>}c2C vR}f׈**h.)_&@pfzjsx:5;S\vKhM5j=!Cn+h"u]a EUN]jn=k<,:Ք>sU!ni~6EJ)¦72?G}[y}_vc$t?iSܟ2Zݞ,VN?_`='RFK1A2qv&X_lLRWY'%:I㢖zb_UEx\>&ɆBˏ~K@ \gYØU4}$8Dv!'Q'*+Εj(UCGo[#< 2Ja(sZi9fZKE Rn`u\9r^Zmɯ׹}mstO4uc~#'jEvۼ Dx[z ޏQ4KL5,5u3>i^uÒ-53ba ~,~/pyt1fMU'CVm:qv~=Y'Es"WsφG?l_kN5}],Ow7 uh`xƫ?zMl7ٻv$A(4Dl(wwH} ?=[=S;yC]^BK>㕪9`Z'Wj;E|:bf>kCԘ#RY,iv쵗~}n'"1u" *uO΄/2^Sxr(!/DD\~mJyZ!MmrA!#u[if|99WB WΡpp}w}sh#,\ &:%˳X?D3 %W0cC?o̲^} F3XLVn]Cߖiϧ!7}yZJ#P7]=)7Ρp;>> Ye^xx{Oafw{ ;>4gfLt ʊ:q%#r/)pv!O4wGh|dS ӣݽހ-gVUC'pBxrB^} 7JA^} /'8!`:r?}}],X  }6y!`/~Br?}Q< >k7vx"] ,' .3jn{-i}|~%-};b6#U)7繎kiEw 㤳:E}[޼c"rꬊ7Dc$~"/Y&zSd:tFȌCrʙ`7u .#[-<)j ?TGS(j~oTup(hjU4PlJ=}|it.ҽ@\wʨuXÞZcx18Wo<~ikOg,ވ\^?EneyZcc0[R١z|zv7_m:_n]a?osS3~j^ hD.a_X'KfBX6w wݶ"Oa:,bvhrWH[uCF-Xfc}>x+Rz)2N-B 7y^٨;[/vg? | |2Sve}=o䑰j[vWjF0{굦?VI~}xM(_TlG__+]:#к?S} c>GŸD7 !w{S{B =x7a?oE#)+Gz:o_4Q<;n?\tt7?mGCџQGu4kņOF>F?#} hP&ђߴM#u!.СtL2^#o nIk_i.~7tr@n 1P~3?.[]=S5b߮~Yo^HFH YBi8a4iom>CKgMy*;?zqEӕ` >zB9iFzC?XF?ޟIܰ펉A}{I5ᄊx%ez#Mp@rߎpi]IOVjzuJt\۰f׺u5><,J~PTJp1)}){9N {!`/> endstream endobj 12 0 obj << /Type /Annot /Subtype /Link /A 13 0 R /Border [0 0 0] /H /I /Rect [ 197.0117 675.3895 357.3317 687.2695 ] >> endobj 13 0 obj << /Type /Action /S /URI /URI (http://www.history.ac.uk/reviews) >> endobj 14 0 obj << /Type /Page /Parent 3 0 R /Contents 15 0 R >> endobj 15 0 obj << /Length 5671 >> stream 0.000 0.000 0.000 rg 0.502 0.502 0.502 RG 0.75 w 0 J [ ] 0 d BT 34.016 796.469 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(States ?partly out of a real belief that peace in Europe would be more secure if the United States was )] TJ ET BT 34.016 782.213 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(committed to its maintenance? \(p. 3\). During the course of the War, however, British statesmen began to )] TJ ET BT 34.016 767.957 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(conclude that France was now the ?paramount concern? and that ?French policy was the most dangerous )] TJ ET BT 34.016 753.701 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(disturbing element in Europe? \(p. 4\). This, of course, was to be a recurring theme in British policy )] TJ ET BT 34.016 739.445 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(throughout the whole inter-war period, and the balancing of this with the input of the United States remained )] TJ ET BT 34.016 725.189 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Britain?s war-time goal until America?s withdrawal from the League process in 1920. America?s decision to )] TJ ET BT 34.016 710.933 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(retreat into isolationism left Britain with the task of reconciling France and Germany, and British statesmen )] TJ ET BT 34.016 696.677 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(saw the possibilities of using the League to assist them in this policy.)] TJ ET BT 34.016 670.421 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(From as early as 1915, Yearwood points out that Lord Robert Cecil, traditionally seen as one of the chief )] TJ ET BT 34.016 656.165 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(architects of the League, believed there was no point in relying on America: ?America cannot make good? )] TJ ET BT 34.016 641.909 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(he repeatedly declared \(p. 13\). It would thus appear that the later decision of America to withdraw should )] TJ ET BT 34.016 627.653 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(not have come as a surprise to the peacemakers at Versailles. Indeed by 1916 it had already become apparent )] TJ ET BT 34.016 613.397 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(that the United States? main interest was not in the terms of the settlement, ?but only in the guarantees of )] TJ ET BT 34.016 599.141 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(peace, which were to be found in disarmament and ?a league of nations to secure each nation against )] TJ ET BT 34.016 584.885 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(aggression and maintain the absolute freedom of the seas?? \(p. 17\) which was to remain a consistent theme )] TJ ET BT 34.016 570.629 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(of American policy during the inter-war years, and which British statesmen were pleased to note was not )] TJ ET BT 34.016 556.373 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(actually catered for in the final version of the Covenant \(p. 129\). America was looking for a ?peace without )] TJ ET BT 34.016 542.117 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(victory? \(p. 37\). The issue of disarmament was, quite understandably, a central theme in early discussions of )] TJ ET BT 34.016 527.861 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(a league of nations, though opinions on the feasibility of implement it varied, Balfour declaring the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 513.605 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(difficulties associated with disarmament to be ?insuperable? \(p. 21\), and Hankey maintaining that this )] TJ ET BT 34.016 499.349 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(should be the league?s only role, but only if the German people could be induced ?to listen to the voice of )] TJ ET BT 34.016 485.093 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(reason? \(p. 23\).)] TJ ET BT 34.016 458.837 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(As with the whole of this book, the amount of detail on the way in which the formation of a league of )] TJ ET BT 34.016 444.581 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(nations was woven into British policy is impressive, and Yearwood provides clear evidence that the League, )] TJ ET BT 34.016 430.325 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(in its final form, was not something to which the British subscribed only in the belief that it would bind the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 416.069 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(United States closer to European politics, but that there was a genuine belief that it could both resolve )] TJ ET BT 34.016 401.813 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(existing problems, and prevent new ones arising. He examines the impact of the abrupt ending of the war, )] TJ ET BT 34.016 387.557 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(the changes in direction which this necessitated, and the dissension over what the League should actually be. )] TJ ET BT 34.016 373.301 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(What emerged was the belief in official British thinking in the centrality of a guarantee which the League )] TJ ET BT 34.016 359.045 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(should embody.)] TJ ET BT 34.016 332.789 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Having established, in great detail, the prominence of a league of nations in British war-time policy, )] TJ ET BT 34.016 318.533 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Yearwood goes on to examine the complicated negotiations which led to the formation of the post-war )] TJ ET BT 34.016 304.277 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(League of Nations. He also provides great detail on the interpretation of the chief articles of the League. The )] TJ ET BT 34.016 290.021 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(League which eventually emerged became central to successive British governments? foreign policies, )] TJ ET BT 34.016 275.765 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(resulting in an eclipse of the Foreign Office, placing greater emphasis on the influence of the Cabinet Office )] TJ ET BT 34.016 261.509 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(and Prime Minister?s personal secretariat \(p. 87\). With the overall theme always being the way in which the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 247.253 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(League remained central to British policy, the book examines the early years, including the major events of )] TJ ET BT 34.016 232.997 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(the Corfu incident, the Treaty of Mutual Guarantee, Geneva Protocol and ending with the negotiations for )] TJ ET BT 34.016 218.741 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(the Locarno Treaties of 1925.)] TJ ET endstream endobj 16 0 obj << /Type /Page /Parent 3 0 R /Contents 17 0 R >> endobj 17 0 obj << /Length 7048 >> stream 0.000 0.000 0.000 rg 0.502 0.502 0.502 RG 0.75 w 0 J [ ] 0 d BT 34.016 784.469 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(While disarmament had been shown to be at the heart of the rationale for a League of Nations, it proved an )] TJ ET BT 34.016 770.213 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(elusive goal. Yearwood points out that the Washington Naval Treaties, which effectively ended the Anglo-)] TJ ET BT 34.016 755.957 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(American naval rivalry, were reached outside the League arena, and ?provided a model of what might be )] TJ ET BT 34.016 741.701 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(achieved in one part of the world?. This was not, however, yet applicable to Europe, where America would )] TJ ET BT 34.016 727.445 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(not make the same commitment as it had done in the Far East, rather appearing as ?Uncle Shylock? the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 713.189 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(?implacable collector of war debts? \(p. 147\). In some areas Yearwood?s obvious commitment to his subject )] TJ ET BT 34.016 698.933 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(almost brings the League back to life. For example, in describing the battle between various members of the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 684.677 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(League Council as to whether Armenia should be admitted to the League, he comments that ?In the history )] TJ ET BT 34.016 670.421 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(of the League this was seen as a defining moment. For the first time the ?atmosphere of Geneva? had entered )] TJ ET BT 34.016 656.165 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(the lungs of the delegates?. The experience ?did much to quicken its consciousness of itself as a corporate )] TJ ET BT 34.016 641.909 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(body having a life and unity of its own?? \(p. 175\).)] TJ ET BT 34.016 615.653 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Failures are, of course, a part of League history: its first crisis was over a dispute between Russia and Persia, )] TJ ET BT 34.016 601.397 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(though set against this was the successful outcome of the ?land islands dispute; however, by 1922 Philip )] TJ ET BT 34.016 587.141 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Baker was already drawing up for the Secretary-General, a memorandum entitled ?The Failure of the League )] TJ ET BT 34.016 572.885 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(and its Causes? \(p. 209\) and there was certainly a view that it had not ?pulled its weight? in the Corfu )] TJ ET BT 34.016 558.629 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(incident \(p. 270\).)] TJ ET BT 34.016 532.373 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(In Chapter five Yearwood moves on to look at the League?s attempts to settle one of the major issues in its )] TJ ET BT 34.016 518.117 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(care: the question of disarmament. It is interesting to note that he states that ?London saw elaborating a )] TJ ET BT 34.016 503.861 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(comprehensive plan of international disarmament as the most important task which would eventually )] TJ ET BT 34.016 489.605 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(confront the League of Nations? \(p. 211\). The author of this review would be interested to know on what )] TJ ET BT 34.016 475.349 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(evidence he bases that opinion. There could well be an argument that Britain considered the question )] TJ ET BT 34.016 461.093 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(difficult rather than important, or even that it was content to let the League address a problem it would rather )] TJ ET BT 34.016 446.837 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(not address itself. The analysis of the Esher Plan and Cecil?s proposed Treaty of Mutual Guarantee is, once )] TJ ET BT 34.016 432.581 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(again, meticulously researched and highlights the fact that Esher?s proposals were not supported by the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 418.325 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(British Government, and Cecil effectively pushed them out of the way in favour of his own. Disarmament )] TJ ET BT 34.016 404.069 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(was not, of course, the only item on the League?s agenda in 1922 and 1923, and detailed accounts of both )] TJ ET BT 34.016 389.813 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(the Chanak and Corfu crises are provided.)] TJ ET BT 34.016 363.557 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(In considering one of the most famous \(or infamous\) attempts of the League to reach a disarmament )] TJ ET BT 34.016 349.301 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(agreement, the abortive Geneva Protocol of 1924, Yearwood provides his usual detailed approach. In the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 335.045 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(course of this discussion he points out that many historians of the time attribute the idea that the Protocol )] TJ ET BT 34.016 320.789 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(would involve the British Fleet in being placed at the disposal of the League Council to a conspiracy by ?the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 306.533 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(most moderate Conservative organs?, when it was, in fact, the French press who began this story ? a small )] TJ ET BT 34.016 292.277 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(point but one which has significance for students of the story of the Protocol \(p. 308\). In analysing what )] TJ ET BT 34.016 278.021 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(many at the time thought of a disaster ? the rejection of the Protocol ? Yearwood points out that, had it come )] TJ ET BT 34.016 263.765 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(into force, it would have clashed with the Covenant in a number of areas \(p. 315\). He also clarifies one of )] TJ ET BT 34.016 249.509 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(the most famous quotes associated with the Foreign Secretary, Austen Chamberlain, who, when repeating )] TJ ET BT 34.016 235.253 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Bismarck?s quote that the ?Polish corridor is not worth the bones of a British grenadier? was careful to add )] TJ ET BT 34.016 220.997 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(?if that alone is in dispute? ? a very telling and often forgotten qualification \(p. 340\).)] TJ ET BT 34.016 194.741 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(At first sight the final chapter on the build-up towards Locarno may seem out of place in a study of the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 180.485 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(League of Nations, as the majority of the negotiations took place outside of the League structure, but )] TJ ET BT 34.016 166.229 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Yearwood clearly demonstrates how Chamberlain endeavoured to tie these negotiations into the League, the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 151.973 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(main aim of which appears to have been to bring Germany into the League, an action about which Germany )] TJ ET BT 34.016 137.717 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(seemed increasingly less enthusiastic \(p. 355\).)] TJ ET BT 34.016 111.461 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(In addition to providing a very thorough account of British policy in relation to the League of Nations in the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 97.205 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(period to 1925, Yearwood has drawn some interesting characterisations of the chief British statesmen of the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 82.949 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(period. His interpretation of the character of Lord Robert Cecil, one of the most central personalities, is often )] TJ ET BT 34.016 68.693 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(quite different from the normally accepted version. The Cecil papers revealed the ?calculations of an active )] TJ ET BT 34.016 54.437 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(ambitious politician? and not the ?idealist? he had expected to find. Lloyd George found Cecil ?spiteful and )] TJ ET endstream endobj 18 0 obj << /Type /Page /Parent 3 0 R /Annots [ 20 0 R ] /Contents 19 0 R >> endobj 19 0 obj << /Length 4716 >> stream 0.000 0.000 0.000 rg 0.502 0.502 0.502 RG 0.75 w 0 J [ ] 0 d BT 34.016 796.469 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(malicious?, and even the gentler Asquith had called him a ?ruffian? \(p. 33\).The portrayal of him as a )] TJ ET BT 34.016 782.213 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(unworldly idealist, a ?civic monk? is deeply misleading: he was an ambitious man whose overriding aim )] TJ ET BT 34.016 767.957 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(was to bring down Lloyd George \(p. 151\), which might, of course, go some way to explaining Lloyd )] TJ ET BT 34.016 753.701 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(George?s view of him! Curzon?s view was that he possessed ?poor judgement and [is] irresponsible? \(p. )] TJ ET BT 34.016 739.445 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(232\) but before supporters of Cecil rush to his defence, Yearwood does comment that in the conflict between )] TJ ET BT 34.016 725.189 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(idealism and cunning ?of course, he was both? \(p. 224\). Austen Chamberlain was a ?helpless, awkward, )] TJ ET BT 34.016 710.933 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(indecisive, vague man? in the opinion of one German diplomat. \(p. 347\). Hankey?s well-known cunning and )] TJ ET BT 34.016 696.677 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(diplomacy shine through in places, but, as in many accounts of this period, it is Balfour?s character which is )] TJ ET BT 34.016 682.421 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(perhaps the most tantalising. Described by Churchill as being ?like a powerful graceful cat?, Balfour?s )] TJ ET BT 34.016 668.165 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(enthusiasm nevertheless ?eventually demolished the one-armed bandit in the foyer of the Htel Beau )] TJ ET BT 34.016 653.909 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Rivage?, and for all his famed languor and apparent indifference, ?good friends of the League and close )] TJ ET BT 34.016 639.653 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(observers believed that he had an unmistakably genuine faith in the new institution? \(p. 171\).)] TJ ET BT 34.016 613.397 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Overall, this is a very authoritative study of British policy towards the League, meticulously researched and )] TJ ET BT 34.016 599.141 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(written. There are one of two slight criticisms. Some of the referencing is unclear, as, in some cases, many )] TJ ET BT 34.016 584.885 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(quotes come from one source, the reference to which is placed at the end of the series, and in other instances )] TJ ET BT 34.016 570.629 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(a number of sources are grouped together without it being quite explicit where each comes from. This is, in )] TJ ET BT 34.016 556.373 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(one respect, a necessary procedure as the footnoting could well take up half of every page if each individual )] TJ ET BT 34.016 542.117 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(quote were referenced, but in some cases clarity seems to have been sacrificed in the interests of brevity. )] TJ ET BT 34.016 527.861 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Also in relation to the question of clarity, one paragraph begins ?The historian of British policy over the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 513.605 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(optional clause ?? \(p. 291\). Do we assume this is Lloyd? Again, the referencing system makes this unclear. )] TJ ET BT 34.016 499.349 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(In some cases the attention to detail is a little over-stretched: for example the emphasis on a ?careful, very )] TJ ET BT 34.016 485.093 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(careful, reading? of Cecil?s speech \(p. 115\), and it may be verging on pedantry to point out in a footnote that )] TJ ET BT 34.016 470.837 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(the attention of an archivist had been drawn to an uncorrected fault in the date of a manuscript \(p. 218\).)] TJ ET BT 34.016 444.581 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(Nevertheless, these criticisms are minor irritations rather than issues which detract from the overall quality )] TJ ET BT 34.016 430.325 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(of this work. This book represents a thorough and authoritative account of Britain?s relationship with the )] TJ ET BT 34.016 416.069 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(League of Nations, and will undoubtedly take its place as an invaluable reference tool for serious researchers )] TJ ET BT 34.016 401.813 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(in this area.)] TJ ET BT 34.016 375.557 Td /F3 12.0 Tf [(Other reviews:)] TJ ET BT 34.016 361.301 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [([2])] TJ ET 0.75 w 0 J [ ] 0 d 34.391 356.575 526.499 1.500 re S BT 34.016 338.795 Td /F3 12.0 Tf [(Source URL:)] TJ ET 0.000 0.000 0.800 rg BT 104.672 338.795 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [(http://www.history.ac.uk/reviews/review/810)] TJ ET 0.000 0.000 0.800 RG 0.24 w 0 J [ ] 0 d 104.672 337.401 m 322.316 337.401 l S 0.000 0.000 0.000 rg BT 34.016 312.424 Td /F3 12.0 Tf [(Links:)] TJ ET BT 34.016 298.024 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [([1] http://www.history.ac.uk/reviews/item/3792)] TJ ET BT 34.016 283.624 Td /F1 12.0 Tf [([2] http://www.history.ac.uk/reviews)] TJ ET endstream endobj 20 0 obj << /Type /Annot /Subtype /Link /A 21 0 R /Border [0 0 0] /H /I /Rect [ 104.6717 337.7155 322.3157 349.5955 ] >> endobj 21 0 obj << /Type /Action /S /URI /URI (http://www.history.ac.uk/reviews/review/810) >> endobj xref 0 22 0000000000 65535 f 0000000008 00000 n 0000000073 00000 n 0000000119 00000 n 0000000342 00000 n 0000000379 00000 n 0000000572 00000 n 0000000654 00000 n 0000004752 00000 n 0000004861 00000 n 0000004971 00000 n 0000005080 00000 n 0000008641 00000 n 0000008769 00000 n 0000008853 00000 n 0000008918 00000 n 0000014642 00000 n 0000014707 00000 n 0000021808 00000 n 0000021892 00000 n 0000026661 00000 n 0000026789 00000 n trailer << /Size 22 /Root 1 0 R /Info 5 0 R >> startxref 26884 %%EOF