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ISSN 1749-8155

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Review Date: 
18 Jun 2015

For all historians of this last, most violent, century some concern with matters of war and peace has been unavoidable.

Review Date: 
4 Jun 2015

Few cultural commentators would feel brave enough to identify a particular month and year when human character underwent a significant transformation- the novelist Virginia Woolf had no such reservations. According to her, December 1910 marked one of these distinctive turning points.

Review Date: 
26 Mar 2015

In the latest of our occasional Reviews in History podcast series, Daniel Snowman talks to Lady Antonia Fraser about her work as a historian and biographer.

Lady Anonia Fraser is British author of history, novels, biographies and detective fiction.

Daniel Snowman is a writer, lecturer and broadcaster on social and cultural history. 

Review Date: 
12 Mar 2015

In the latest of our occasional Reviews in History podcast series, Daniel Snowman talks to Professor Roy Foster about his recent book, Vivid Faces: The Revolutionary Generation in Ireland, 1890-1923,  as well as issues surrounding Anglo-Irish history, historiography and biography.

Review Date: 
21 May 2015

Jisc’s Historical Texts brings together for the first time three important collections of historical texts, spanning five centuries: Early English Books Online (EEBO), Eighteenth Century Collections Online (ECCO), and the British Library 19th-century collection.

Review Date: 
11 Jun 2015

Rather like the ever-rising middle classes, in every decade of modern history British men appear to be in the midst of becoming better fathers.

Review Date: 
26 Mar 2015

The funniest moment in the British Library’s wonderful Magna Carta: Law Liberty, Legacy exhibition comes towards its end, in a recent cartoon by Stephen Collins (sadly not reproduced in the excellent catalogue, but available

Review Date: 
14 May 2015

On the ninth of September, 1513, the reign of James IV, Scotland’s increasingly powerful and well-regarded Renaissance prince, came to an abrupt and unforeseen end near to the village of Branxton in Northumberland.

Review Date: 
14 May 2015

Reviewing this book is a challenge. The ‘handbook’ genre falls somewhere between that of an encyclopedia and that of the textbook but without the overall coverage, both of topics and details, of the former nor the communications-driven ‘narrative arc’ of the latter.

Review Date: 
30 Apr 2015

This is a useful contribution to the growing body of research on 19th-century Irish print media (it begins with a survey of academic literature on the subject).

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