History syllabus University of London

Prizes and Scholarships

Norman Hepburn Baynes Prize

The Norman Hepburn Baynes Prize was established from a Bequest made to the University in 1961 by Professor N. H. Baynes, who was Professor of Byzantine History at University College London from 1931 until 1942. He was given the title of Emeritus Professor in 1943 and a Doctor of Literature honoris causa in 1951.

The Bequest was to establish a biennial Prize for an essay on some aspect of history, including art, religion and thought of the Mediterranean lands within the period 400 BC to AD 1453. The award, valued at £3,000, is, according to the Will of Professor Baynes:

...open to all persons who have taken a degree of the University of London and/or those who are pursuing a course in the University of London in preparation for a higher degree provided that not more than eight years have elapsed since their first registration for a first degree of the University or more than six years since their first registration for a higher degree of the University...

In view of the above stipulation candidates should provide evidence of their degrees, i.e. those obtained and/or for which they are registered. For those candidates registered for the M.Phil./Ph.D. degree who have previously completed a Master's degree at the University of London, the six years will commence with the date of registration for the M.Phil./Ph.D. degree.

The essay may take the form of one or more completed chapters of an intended thesis. If a candidate decides to submit a chapter or chapters of his/her thesis, he/she should ensure that the essay has appropriate additional prefatory and concluding material in order to make it accessible to non-expert readers. It is not a condition of the Bequest that further study or research shall be attached to the award of the Prize. A candidate who is registered for a higher degree should submit the title of his/her thesis together with the entry. It is recommended that the submitted material should not exceed 15,000 words. It should be in English and typewritten. Submissions may not include work that has already been published.

The Prize shall next be available for award in 2010 and entries in triplicate should be submitted to the Secretary of the Academic Trust Funds Committee, University of London, Senate House, Room 106, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU by 1 March 2010.

Julian Corbett Prize in Modern Naval History

A prize to the value of £1,000 is available annually for work not previously published and based on original (Ms. or printed) materials for Modern Naval History. The work shall be written in English and may take the form of either (i) a dissertation, (ii) an edition of an original document or series of documents, or (iii) a critical report on material at home or abroad. It is recommended that the length should not exceed 15,000 words.

The deadline date is 1 October 2012. New forms will be available from March 2010. Details will be available from the Awards Section of the Institute's website.

Derby-Bryce Prizes

The Derby-Bryce Prizes in History and in Law were established in 1987 through the amalgamation of funds provided by the late fifteenth Earl of Derby, Chancellor of the University from 1891 to 1893, and the late Lord Bryce, a member of the Senate from 1894 to 1900.

The Derby-Bryce Prizes in History are awarded by the Academic Trust Funds Committee on the nomination of the Subject Panel in History to the best two candidates at the final examinations for the BA Degree in History. The Prizes are available to both Internal and External Students and to students taking History as part of a Combined Studies degree.

The Sir John Neale Prize in Tudor History

The Neale Prize is awarded annually to a historian in the early stages of his or her career. Entries should take the form of essays of no more than 8,000 words including footnotes, on a theme related to Tudor history. It is intended that the terms of the prize include almost any subject appropriate to the study of the 16th Century in England . (Eligibility will ultimately be decided by the judges). The prize will consist of £1000 with an additional payment of £500 in support of the development of the prize- winner's scholarly career, normally in the form of research and/or travel expenses and conference attendance.

Candidates must either be registered for a higher degree at a British institution or have been registered for such a degree at a British institution within the last three years. Electronic submissions only will be accepted. Entries must not have been published elsewhere, or accepted for publication elsewhere. The prize-winning essay will be published in the IHR's journal, Historical Research.

A suitable academic mentor will be appointed to provide advice on career development and research for the prize-winner. The prize-winner is expected to take part in the academic life of the IHR, for example, by attending seminars and presenting papers.The prize-winner must submit a report on his/her activity undertaken with the support of the award to the Director of the IHR at the end of the academic year in which the award is held.

The winner will be announced at the reception following the Royal Historical Society's Annual Prothero Lecture in July each year.

Entries should be sent to James Lees at the Institute of Historical Research. Further information can be obtained by emailing james.lees@sas.ac.uk.

The closing date is 31 May 2012. Details will be available from the Awards Section of the Institute's website.

Research Fellowships at the Institute of Historical Research

The Institute of Historical Research administers up to six Research Fellowships in History each year, tenable at the Institute, for PhD candidates who have already completed at least two years' research on their chosen topic.

The Fellowships funded by the Royal Historical Society are open to candidates without regard to nationality or academic affiliation.

The Fellowships funded by the Scouloudi Foundation are open to UK citizens or to candidates with a first degree from an UK university.

The Isobel Thornley Fellowship is open to any candidate registered for their doctoral degree at the University of London.

Closing date 1 March 2012. Details will be available from the Fellowships Section of the Institute's website.

Economic History Society Fellowships

The Economic History Society in conjunction with the Institute of Historical Research offers up to four one-year Research Fellowships in Economic/Social History. The Fellowships will be awarded either to:

  1. Postdoctoral candidates who have recently completed a doctoral degree in economic/social history (broadly defined)
  2. Graduates who are engaged in the completion of a doctoral degree in economic/social history (broadly defined) but who must have completed at least three years' (full-time) research on their chosen topic.

The Fellowships are open to UK citizens or to candidates with a degree from an UK university.

The closing date is 2 April 2012. Information from James Lees, Fellowship Officer, Institute of Historical Research (james.lees@sas.ac.uk) or visit the Fellowships Section of the Institute's website.

Past and Present Fellowships

The Past and Present Society and the Institute of Historical Research offer up to two one-year postdoctoral Research Fellowship in History tenable at the Institute.

The Fellowship will be awarded to a graduate who expects to have submitted his/her doctoral thesis in history (broadly defined) by 1 October of the year of the Fellowship. Preference will be given to applicants who demonstrate a broad interest in processes of social, economic, political and cultural change, as manifested in their particular field of study. The Society wishes to promote work of a kind that might be published in the journal Past and Present and its book series, Past and Present Publications.

Applicants may be of any nationality, and their PhD (or equivalent) may have been awarded in any country.

The closing date is 12 April 2012. Information from James Lees, Fellowship Officer, Institute of Historical Research (james.lees@sas.ac.uk) or visit the Fellowships Section of the Institute's website.

The Alan Pearsall Fellowship in Naval and Maritime History

The Alan Pearsall Bequest and the Institute of Historical Research will offer a one-year postdoctoral Research Fellowship in Naval and Maritime History, tenable at the Institute. The Fellowship stipend will be £22,000 for a full academic year. It will be payable in four quarterly instalments through the Institute.

The closing date for applications is 12 April 2012. Information from James Lees, Fellowship Officer, Institute of Historical Research (james.lees@sas.ac.uk) or visit the Awards Section of the Institute's website.

IHR Mellon Fellowships in the Humanities

The Institute of Historical Research offers fellowships funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation for both pre-dissertation and dissertation research in the humanities using original sources. The purposes of this fellowship programme are to:

  • help doctoral candidates in the humanities who may otherwise not have opportunities or encouragement to work with original source materials in the United Kingdom;
  • help doctoral candidates in the humanities to deepen their ability to develop knowledge from original sources;
  • provide insight from the viewpoint of doctoral candidates into how scholarly resources can be developed most helpfully in the future.

The competition is now closed. The 2012-13 competition will open in December 2012.

Richard III Society Bursary

The Richard III Society Bursary (valued at c. £250) is open to any person registered for a higher degree. Applicants should be intending to write a dissertation or thesis on (i) some aspect of late fifteenth century English history, literature, architecture or art history, (ii) any late medieval English or European subject relevant to the Yorkist period in English history, although applications for the first category will be considered first.

Further details and application forms are available from the Fellowships Officer, Institute of Historical Research or from the Awards Section of the Institute's website. The closing date for applications is 1 June 2012.

Robin Humphreys Bursary

The Robin Humphreys Bursary is awarded annually to a student majoring in history and registered for the MA in Area Studies (Latin America) at the Institute for the Study of the Americas. Details of how to apply are available from the Institute's Postgraduate Administrator.

Scholarship for Huguenot Research

This annual scholarship of £2,000 is awarded by the Trustees of the French Protestant Church, Soho Square, on the advice of the Institute of Historical Research, and in collaboration with the Huguenot Society of London.

The award will be made to a student working for a higher degree on a Huguenot subject, i.e. the study of any activity on the French, the Dutch, the Flemish or the Walloon Protestants from the sixteenth century to the present, in any geographical area. 'Activity' will be interpreted in the widest sense to cover religious, political, economic, social and intellectual history as well as the history of the arts and sciences.

Further information can be obtained from the Fellowships Officer, Institute of Historical Research and from the Awards Section of the Insitute's website.

 

Alternatively, visit the following website http://www.london.ac.uk/crf and also www.london.ac.uk/awards_pg for details of other Academic Trust Fund awards.