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This event is the fourth roundtable of the Partnership Seminar Series The archives of Global History in a time of international immobility

Note: The time above is for London (GMT+1 / BST). The seminar will take place at 14:30 London; 15:30 Amsterdam; 16:30 Istanbul; 19:00 New Delhi.

Speaking to the broader themes of the seminar series, The archives of Global History in a time of international immobilitythis roundtable on Science, Technology, and Senses considers the notion of disruption in the global history of science and technology and the persistence use of indigenous technologies. Should the pandemic open the question, where are the archives of global history of science and technology?

Speakers:

Namrata R. Ganneri is Assistant Professor in History at S.N.D.T College of Arts & S.C.B College of Commerce & Science for Women, Mumbai. She is currently working on a monograph on post-independent India’s smallpox eradication programme which is a projected outcome of her Commonwealth- Rutherford Fellowship (2018-2020) at the University of York (UK).

Ugurgul Tunc is a PhD candidate at Koç University. Her research interests include the history and architecture of healthcare spaces and curatorial studies. She is the resident curator of the Smithsonian Institute’s Outbreak exhibit in Turkey and a contributor to the history section of the Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology Journal.

Manikarnika Dutta has recently completed her Wellcome Trust-funded DPhil project at the Oxford Centre for the History of Science, Medicine and Technology, University of Oxford. Her research examined the health and sanitary regulation of European seamen in colonial Indian port cities, integrating the history of health, imperial governance, and maritime exchange in the British Empire. 

Andreas Weber is assistant professor of Science, Technology, and Culture at the University of Twente in The Netherlands. He has a special research interest in the history of science and empire in insular Southeast Asia. This includes research into how computational technologies can be used to contextualize and provide access to digitized scientific archives and collections in the field of colonial natural history.

Chaired by Bengu Aydin Dikmen.

Note: This seminar may be recorded and made available, with speakers’ consent. The recording will not show the names of muted attendees and the audience Q and A will not be recorded.


All welcome, this seminar is free to attend but booking is required.

Image Credit: Jennifer O’Donnell, Archive Folders, 2012, watercolour.