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ISSN 1749-8155

Special issue - Anglo-Saxon England: A Decade of Research

This special issue has been curated by Dr Irene Bavuso, Economic History Society Postan Fellow at the Institute of Historical Research. The selection provides an overview of research on Anglo-Saxon England published over the last decade (2008-2018). Many of the selected works propose new approaches for the study of this period, providing a wide-ranging picture on Anglo-Saxon England. The included works cover a broad range of themes, often offering challenging perspectives on debated topics. The books and the electronic resource span from Christianisation and the influence of Christian theology and religion on Anglo-Saxon society, the Viking ages in England, law and social order, prosopography, and political and socio-economic developments during the Late Anglo-Saxon period. Other contributions, although not specifically on England, offer thought-provoking perspectives on fundamental topics, such as slavery, kingship, and the Anglo-Saxon cultural influence on the Continent, helping us to situate England in its broader European context.

Review Date: 
29 Jun 2017

It is the title which gives away a great deal about this very fine book, and should alert us to Tom Lambert’s ambition for this project, which has grown out of a University of Durham PhD thesis. ‘Law’ positions it as a work of legal history, but it is the component of ‘order’ which offers the second and bolder half of Lambert’s argument.

Review Date: 
3 Aug 2017

In this masterful monograph, Alice Rio revisits one of the central questions in the historiography of early medieval Western Europe: how did the transition from slavery to serfdom take place?

Review Date: 
1 Dec 2016

The 13 essays in this book are the outcome of a conference (with the addition of a few other papers) held at Winchester University in September 2011.

Review Date: 
11 Feb 2016

In The Formation of the English Kingdom in the Tenth Century, George Molyneaux investigates how territories under the dominion of the Cerdicing kings of Wessex developed into a clearly defined and conquerable kingdom. The book’s fundamental argument is that the period 871 through 1066 cannot be treated as a cohesive block of history.

Review Date: 
22 Oct 2015

This book offers an investigation into the Anglo-Saxon cultural province of Francia during the eighth century (more specifically the area between the Middle Main and Tauber valleys), which, to borrow the author’s own words, ‘argues that the Christian culture of that region was thoroughly gender-egalitarian and in many ways feminist’ (p. 3).

Review Date: 
27 Nov 2014

The volume’s stated aim is to investigate the influence of Christian theology and religious beliefs on Anglo-Saxon society. In doing so Foxhall Forbes endeavours to show the wider population’s engagement with Christian theology, which has usually been regarded as the preserve of the educated elite.

Review Date: 
12 Sep 2013

Peter Sawyer is one of our most distinguished Anglo-Saxon or, perhaps better, Anglo-Scandinavian historians.

Review Date: 
3 May 2012

Anglo-Saxon historians are in an enviable position when it comes to electronic resources.

Review Date: 
1 Oct 2011

Æthelstan might not, to the uninitiated, seem a very likely candidate for a volume in the prestigious Yale English Monarchs series. He lacks the name-recognition associated with a Conquerer or a Confessor, and is not the subject of any compelling anecdotes about beaches or cakes which have wormed their way into the popular consciousness.

Review Date: 
1 Oct 2011

‘When medieval men and women thought and wrote about power in the early Middle Ages – what it was, what it should be, what it had been – peace was never far from their thoughts’ (p. 271). Thus writes Paul Kershaw in the last paragraph of this important work on the ideas behind rulership but it explains perfectly the previous 270-odd pages.

Review Date: 
1 Dec 2010

This is an accessible and engaging book about the ranks, obligations, and image of the Anglo-Saxon aristocracy, written by one of the leading historians of the period. Ann Williams is the author of The English and the Norman Conquest, Kingship and Government in Pre-Conquest England c.

Review Date: 
28 Feb 2010

The publisher’s blurb for Marilyn Dunn’s new book claims that it is ‘the first work on the subject to combine a historical approach with insights provided by ethnography and anthropology’. As is often the case with publisher’s statements, this is something of an exaggeration.